News Bulletin

"O say does that star-spangled banner yet wave, / O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave?" - Francis Scott Key
Locked
Huojin
General Secretary
General Secretary
Posts: 3354
Joined: 07:30:29 Thursday, 02 August, 2012

News Bulletin

Post by Huojin » 02:23:42 Sunday, 04 January, 2015

News

*The after effects of Hurricane Allen, the major Category 5 hurricane that struck the Caribbean, Mexico, and the MSA in August continue to be felt. Although the Mountain States coastline suffered far less than elsewhere struck, a federal report announces that in addition to the 7 dead in Texas and 17 in Louisiana, the damage is calculated to be approximately $860 million worth - with one hurricane-spawned-tornado that struck Austin, Texas causing $100 million itself.
*President Arnoldo Martinez of the Workers’ Republic of Mexico cuts short his state visit to the Mountain States of America, where he was engaged in talks with President David Cargo and MSAmerican business leaders, when news reaches the MSA of a major earthquake in central and southern Mexico. Centered around the state of Oaxaca, reports thus far indicate that at least 300 have been killed, with an additional 150,000 left homeless.
*Falling short of profit projections over the Christmas period leads May Department Stores to announce significant staff cutbacks at a number of to-be-determined locations across the country.
*Department of the Interior reports indicate that the American bison, whose population had been recovering from its low-point of the 500s in the 18th century, has in recent years, declined. Reported at 15,000 in 1975, the latest counts put the figure at around 12,000. No clear reasons for the decline have been established as of yet. The American bison, prior to the discovery of the New World, had a population well in excess of 60 million.
*Air transportation of cargo between cities in the MSA, PSA, and USA continues to rise in popularity, marking a decline in profits for other forms of transportation, such as the railways. Although deemed in little danger of being superseded entirely, passenger transport remains an areas of uncertainty.
*In the Mountain League Baseball Championship (MLBC), the St Louis Cardinals face off against the Kansas City Royals. Having been the underdogs all season long, the Royals put up a stern fight but were ultimately defeated by the Cardinals, who lifted the Championship Cup yet again in a victory for the Missouri team.
*The Anaconda Mining Company end-of-year report suggests that ore quantities and qualities at their Montana mines is decreasing. One of the largest copper mines in the world and central to the state economy, concerns have been raised over future development plans.
*Video game arcades continue to grow in popularity, spreading from cities to smaller towns. This is partially spurred on by the release of games such as Pakkuman (rebranded as Pac-Man in North America), which exceeded their lukewarm response in the Home Islands of Japan to spread like wildfire across the Pacific States and into the Mountain States. The United States continues to ban such games as reminiscent of “decadent Oriental culture”.
*A budgetary proposal to contract the McDonnell Aircraft Corporation to develop a new fighter jet falls through when the House of Representatives votes against it. Rumours on Capitol Hill suggest the influence of PSAmerican aviation company lobbyists, or even the PS and US governments themselves, who may be seeking to sell aircraft they are retiring in the near future.
*Acceding to continued complaints by the Japanese American Citizens League, President David Cargo announces that he has utilised the power of executive order to launch a Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC), tasked with investigating the lengthy use of holding camps during the war and in its immediate aftermath.
*Standard Oil of California (SOCAL) continues expanding its gas station operations in the MSA, as well as buying up smaller wells near the border with the PSA. Concerns, both industry and political, have been raised over the rapid rise of this company, based in the Pacific States.


DECISION 1980

*Election fever rocks the Mountain States yet again, as elections are held for the whole House of Representatives, Class I Senators, and crucially, the highest office in the land - the Presidency.

Despite the major popularity of President Stassen, his successor and former Vice President, David Cargo, is unable to galvanise the nation behind another four years of Republican government. His issues began with the Republican Party itself, with scattered doubts over whether to renominate him. Although no serious challengers emerge, it is clear from the off that President Cargo’s generally vague Presidency has been largely overshadowed by his far more popular predecessor’s term in office, and has been characterised as largely reactive, rather than proactive. However he was praised by the public for his handling of a rail workers strike and reaching out to the new South African government.

Against him, after a heated primary battle, the Progressive Party selected Charles Efraim Stone, a Moderate from Colorado. The Progressive Party also adopted an old strategy of running a Progressive-Socialist ticket, with Paul Roux-Johnson as a Socialist Vice Presidential candidate.

The electoral race is drawn out and filled with debates, but with a poor mid-term performance hanging over the head of the Republican campaign, the electorate is drawn to Stone’s charm offensives, while his fiery outbursts are cleverly directed by his campaign staff towards debates and speeches. Attracted to a more dynamic brand of politics, the polls place Stone ahead of Cargo from the early stages of the race. Running on a platform of a firm stance against the PSA and USA, pledges to fight urban poverty, and supportive of public works projects, the Stone campaign gains further momentum. Although the Cargo campaign regains some ground late on by playing on the extremely vague military policies of the Progressives, at a time when debate over the Treaty of Saint Paul is only intensifying, it is too little, too late.

At the polls, the result soon emerges - Charles E Stone - President-Elect of the Mountain States of America. In a victory speech at City Park in his hometown of Denver, Colorado, the President-Elect was joined by his wife, Alanna Stone, and his eldest child, 20 year old daughter Lilly, a student in college. He reaffirmed his commitment to the America people, congratulated President Cargo on a well-fought campaign, and pledged to continue in the lineage of the great Progressive Presidents of the past, ending with campaign slogan - “A Mountain Man for the Mountain States”. His younger child, 19 year old Edward Stone, was not present, having left college to join the Mountain States Marine Corps.

*Throughout the Stassen and Cargo governments the Republican Party has held a majority in the Senate - no longer. The Class I Senatorial elections see the Republicans only lose seats - crucially in Montana to the Progressives, marking a major breakthrough in that previously staunchly Republican state; in Colorado, and in Missouri, which becomes a major Progressive state again. Nonetheless, they hold onto seats in Wyoming, North Dakota, Nebraska, and Kansas, leaving their total at 12.

It is not all plain sailing for the Progressives, though. While they may share a ticket and a coalition with the Socialists, in the legislative races there is little holding back. In a particularly shocking race, the senior Progressive Hard Left Senator for New Mexico is ousted by a Socialist candidate, marking New Mexico as the only state presently fielding two Socialist senators. The Progressives remain two seats short of a total majority in the Senate, but their agreement with the Socialists gives their combined caucus a bare majority.

*In the House of Representatives, where previously there had been no clear majority but a left-leaning coalition of Progressives and Socialists consistently worked together, the post-election situation merely exemplifies the situation. The Republicans lose seats to both the Progressives and Socialists, although the Progressives fall five seats short of an overall majority with 41 seats. The GOP remains close behind with 35 seats, while the Socialists pick up their greatest number of seats in several electoral cycles - 14 seats.

In notable battleground states, former President Harold Stassen aids Republican hopes in his native Minnesota, seeing two of the state’s 9 representatives turn blue. In Oklahoma, the electorate turns out for the GOP in a major way, breaking with its Senators. Socialists make major gains in Texas and New Mexico, primarily from Progressive candidates, while Progressives return the favor in Louisiana, increasing their position to 5 of the state’s 8 representatives.

International News

*George Wallace, President of the United States of America, is re-elected for a third term in the White House with 99.8% of the vote in an 89.3% turnout election, despite his paralysis from the waist down following an assassination attempt in 1972. His campaign pledges, echoing those of the past, continue to promise “segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever”.
*In the aftermath of the election, protests and rioting in several US cities, particularly in the South, continue. Racially motivated and charged, the violent proceedings are repeatedly broken up and dispersed by National Guard units, mobilised by Executive Order, leaving indeterminate numbers of dead in their wake. Vice President John C Stennis reportedly condemned the rioting as being incited by enemies of the state, including the Black Liberation Army, the Cubans, the Mexicans, and the Japanese. Accusations are also levelled at the Mountain States of America, although for the less severe charge of “condoning” rather than “aiding and supplying” terrorism. No official response has been announced.
*The MGM Grand Hotel and Casino on the Las Vegas Strip burns down on November 21st, killing 85 people, the worst disaster in Nevadan history. After a swift intervention by the Pacific States federal government, reconstruction contracts are granted to a small handful of zaibatsu-associated businessmen, many of whom it is remarked upon in Mountain American newspapers, have reportedly close ties to top-ranking Pacific States officials.
*The aftermath of Hurricane Allen continues to cause chaos in Haiti. High winds and flash flooding have left more than $400 million in damages, with 60% of the coffee crop destroyed, 220 people killed, and 835,000 left homeless. Compounding the situation, the Tonton Macoutes, a right-wing, Duvalierist militia, wreaking havoc in the countryside. Their reign of terror in rural areas outside of government control grows ever worse. Cuban aid is sent to assist with rebuilding in the aftermath of the storm.
*President Anastasio Somoza of Nicaragua remains defiant, holed up in the capital of Managua, as Toledanist Sandinista rebels continue their advance. The situation is dire, but generous Italian military aid (shipped in primarily through Italian-friendly Costa Rica under the auspices of the San Jose Compact) and the presence of Fascist military advisers allows the regime to hold out for now.
*Mountain States and Commonwealth technicians and engineers are brought in to assist the Workers’ Republic of Mexico’s Comisión Nacional del Espacio Exterior as it begins work on a new project. Critics in the PSA and USA condemn the project as an obvious attempt to gain weapons of mass destruction. Others more impartial observers believe it to be a first foray into peaceful space exploration. However political debate inside the MSA questions to what extent assisting in any rocketry program might violate the present understanding of the Treaty of Saint Paul. For the time being, the project’s goals remain speculative.

Mountain States of America
Image

Motto: None
Map: http://i.imgur.com/XdRSari.png
Date: Q4 1980
Population: 46,379,782
Capital: Kansas City

Government:
Executive power vested in the Cabinet, headed by the President. The President is chosen by indirect elections every four years by the Electoral College, running with the Vice President on the same electoral “ticket”. The Cabinet is chosen and serves at the President’s pleasure, and is confirmed by the Senate.

Popularity: 75/100 (+35 newly elected)

President: Charles E Stone (P-M) - Smyg
Vice President: Paul Roux-Johnson (S) - OYID

Secretary of State: [none appointed or confirmed]
Secretary of the Treasury: [none appointed or confirmed]
Secretary of Defense: [none appointed or confirmed]
Attorney General: [none appointed or confirmed]
Secretary of the Interior: [none appointed or confirmed]
Secretary of Agriculture: [none appointed or confirmed]
Secretary of Commerce: [none appointed or confirmed]
Secretary of Labor: [none appointed or confirmed]
Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare: [none appointed or confirmed]
Secretary of Veterans Affairs: [none appointed or confirmed]

Next Presidential Election: Q4 1984


Legislative power vested in the Mountain States Congress, divided into the Senate (upper chamber) and the House of Representatives (lower chamber). The Senate is chosen by staggered elections every 2 years, divided into 3 classes which are chosen every 6 years. The House of Representatives are re-elected as a whole every 2 years.

Mountain States Senate

President pro tempore: ???
Senate Majority Leader: Nathan Hanlon (P-H) - Snacks
Senate Majority Whip: XXX
Senate Minority Leader: Franklin Weeks (R-M) - Maddox
Senate Minority Whip: XXX

Progressives: 14
—Progressive Moderates: 5
—Progressive Liberals: 2
—Progressive Hard Left: 2
—Progressive Conservatives: 5

Republicans: 12
—Republican Moderates: 5
—Republican Conservatives: 3
—Republican Liberals: 3
—Republican Neo-Conservatives: 1

Socialists: 4
—Socialist: 3
—Socialist Workers: 1

Mountain States House of Representatives

Speaker of the House: Anthony C Nordquist (P-L) - Gesar
House Majority Leader: XXX
House Majority Whip: XXX
House Minority Leader: Matthew J Carpenter (R-C) Coinneach
House Minority Whip: XXX

Progressives: 41
—Progressive Moderates: 10
—Progressive Liberals: 14
—Progressive Hard Left: 11
—Progressive Conservatives: 6

Republicans: 35
—Republican Moderates: 12
—Republican Conservatives: 13
—Republican Liberals: 4
—Republican Neo-Conservatives: 6

Socialists: 14
—Socialist: 10
—Socialist Workers: 4

Next House of Representatives Election: Q4 1982
Next Senate Class I Election: Q4 1986
Next Senate Class II Election: Q4 1982
Next Senate Class III Election: Q4 1984


Political Parties:

Progressive Party
—Progressive Moderates [Social Liberalism, Progressivism] - Jose Marquez Smyg
—Progressive Liberals [Progressivism, Trade Unionism] - Anthony C Nordquist Gesar
—Progressive Hard Left [Democratic Socialism, Leftist] - Nathan Hanlon Snacks
—Progressive Conservatives [Neoliberalism, Centre-rightist] - Orval Scott Litos

Republican Party
—Republican Moderates [Social Conservatism, Centre-rightist] - Franklin Weeks Maddox
—Republican Conservatives [Conservative, Rightist] - Matthew J Carpenter Coinneach
—Republican Liberals [Social Conservatism, Centrist] - Christopher Miller RinKou
—Republican Neo-Conservatives [Neoconservatism, Firm Anti-fascism] - Leanna J Freeman ykl

Socialist Party
—Socialist [Socialism, Leftist, Trade Unionism] - Philip Donovan OYID
—Socialist Workers [Far Left, Pro-Mexico, Toledanist]

Minor Parties:
Workers’ Revolutionary Party [Toledanist, Trotskyist, Anti-Mexico]
Constitutionalist Party [Nationalism, Paleoconservatism, Rightist]
Communist Party USA [Communism, Marxism, Anti-fascism]
Greater United American Way Party [Pro-PSA, Pro-Japan, Militarism, Statism]
American People’s Unity Party [Pro-USA, Pro-German, National Socialism, White Supremacism]


States: 15

Montana
Population: 786,690

Senators:
Republican-M - Class II
Progressive-M - Class I
Representatives: 2
1 Republican - 1 Republican-N
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-M

Overview: Source of some of the largest copper deposits in the world, as well as gold, silver and coal mining. Lumber felling also a source of income.

Wyoming
Population: 469,557

Senators:
Republican-M - Class I
Republican-C - Class II
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-N

Overview: Produces coal, natural gas, oil and uranium, supplemented by agricultural efforts, including livestock, grains, and wool.

Colorado
Population: 2,889,964

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class I
Republican-N - Class III
Representatives: 6
3 Republican - 1 Republican-M, 1 Republican-C, 1 Republican-N
3 Progressive - 2 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-M

Overview: Contains substantial gold and silver mines, as well as natural gas and oil drilling. Machinery and industry also present in large concentrations. Cattle and dairy also common.

New Mexico
Population: 1,303,302

Senators:
Socialist - Class II
Socialist - Class I
Representatives: 3
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-H
1 Republican - 1 Republican-C
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Home to substantial Hispanic population, as a result of Latin American immigration from allied countries. Also holds some of the largest concentrations of Asians in the MSA, a combination of those who fled the war on the Pacific Coast, and more recent immigrants. Growing gang violence and organised crime in urban areas. Substantial copper and uranium mines, as well as oil and natural gas drilling. Agricultural produce includes chiles, pecans, potatoes, and livestock.

North Dakota
Population: 652,717

Senators:
Republican-M - Class III
Republican-L - Class I
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-M

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing cereals, buckwheat, corn, and oilseeds.

South Dakota
Population: 690,768

Senators:
Republican-M - Class II
Republican-C - Class III
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-C

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, corn, wheat, and soybeans. Also holds tourism draws, such as Mt. Rushmore.

Nebraska
Population: 1,569,825

Senators:
Republican-C - Class I
Republican-L - Class III
Representatives: 3
3 Republican - 1 Republican-M, 1 Republican-C, 1 Republican-N

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, corn, and soybeans.

Kansas
Population: 2,363,679

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class III
Republican-L - Class I
Representatives: 5
3 Progressive - 1 Progressive-M, 1 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-L
1 Republican - 1 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Shares the capital city with Missouri. Outside of the thriving urban centre, primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, wheat, soybeans, cotton, and more.

Oklahoma
Population: 3,025,290

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class II
Socialist - Class III
Representatives: 6
5 Republican - 3 Republican-M, 2 Republican-C
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-H

Overview: Hosts the largest concentration of Native Americans in the MSA, as well as a growing Hispanic population as new immigrants make their way north from the border states. Substantial aviation industry interests, as well as oil and natural gas. Largely secondary agricultural sector, including livestock, dairy and wheat.

Texas
Population: 14,229,191

Senators:
Progressive-H - Class I
Progressive-M - Class II
Representatives: 27
11 Progressive - 6 Progressive-H, 3 Progressive-M, 2 Progressive-L
9 Republican - 4 Republican-C, 2 Republican-M, 2 Republican-N, 1 Republican-L
7 Socialist - 5 Socialist, 2 Socialist-W

Overview: Most economically powerful state, producing substantial oil and natural gas. Also home to livestock farming, fisheries, and some crops including cereals and cotton. Has seen growing Hispanic population as immigration (legal and illegal) from allied Latin American countries increases.

Minnesota
Population: 4,075,970

Senators:
Progressive-L - Class I
Progressive-M - Class II
Representatives: 8
5 Progressive - 4 Progressive-L, 1 Progressive-M
2 Republican - 2 Republican-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Substantial agricultural producer, including sugar beets, sweetcorn, poultry, and lumber.

Iowa
Population: 2,913,808

Senators:
Progressive-L - Class II
Republican-M - Class III
Representatives: 6
3 Republican - 3 Republican-C
2 Progressive - 1 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Substantial agricultural producer, including livestock, dairy products, corn, and other crops.

Missouri
Population: 4,916,686

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class I
Progressive-C - Class III
Representatives: 9
6 Progressive - 3 Progressive-L, 2 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-M
2 Republican - 1 Republican-L, 1 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Shares the capital city with Kansas. Gateway transportation hub between the USA and MSA. Home to substantial aviation industry, as well as light manufacturing and lead and limestone mining.

Arkansas
Population: 2,286,435

Senators:
Progressive-H - Class II
Progressive-M - Class III
Representatives: 4
3 Progressive - 2 Progressive-H, 1 Progressive-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist-W

Overview: Strong Southern identity, yet also home to substantial black population. Notable for production of cotton, lumber, automobiles and bauxite.

Louisiana:
Population: 4,205,900

Senators:
Progressive-M - Class II
Socialist-W - Class III
Representatives: 8
5 Progressive - 2 Progressive-M, 2 Progressive-L, 1 Progressive-H
2 Republican - 2 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist-W

Overview: Substantial black population, primarily from post-war refugees and illegal immigrants from the USA. Remaining French influence from colonial era. Has substantial fishing, livestock and agriculture sectors, in addition to industrial sectors producing paper, petroleum and chemicals. Also notable for its film industry (the Hollywood of the South).


Economy:
Finance: Mountain Federal Reserve Bank based in Kansas City issues the Mountain States Dollar (MSD), derived from the old US dollar.

Services: 36.1% GDP, 26.7% labour force. Substantial spread over the sector; main contributors include real estate, aviation, tourism, and transport. 85% private, 10% joint-venture, 5% state-owned.
Industry: 43.9% GDP, 39.1% labour force. Primarily based in mining (copper, gold, silver, coal, sulphur, etc), and oil and gas drilling. Slightly lesser contribution from manufacturing. 70% private, 20% joint-venture, 10% state-owned.
Agriculture: 20.0% GDP, 29.2% labour force. Increasingly dominated by large companies and businesses. Improving mechanisation also leading to falling employment in this sector. 95% private, 5% joint-venture.
Unemployment: 5% (1.7% frictional, 3.3% structural)

Credit Rating: AA
Outlook: Positive

Government Budget
Treasury: 200 credits
Surplus: -15 (315 Revenue - 330 Expenditure)

Revenue: +315

Tax: +275 credits
Income Tax: +110
—Working Class - Somewhat Low: +48
—Middle Class - Somewhat Low: +36
—Upper Class - Moderate: +26

Social Insurance: +82 credits

Corporation Tax: +55 credits (550 Private Sector/10) [rounded up]

Trade Tariffs: +28
USA: +6 credits
PSA: +6 credits
Canada: +6 credits
Mexico: +10 credits


Public Corporations: +40
Post Service: -10 credit (+0 profit - 10 running cost)
State-owned industry: +30 credit (+50 profit - 20 running cost)
State-owned services: +20 credits (+40 profit, -20 running cost)
Mountain Federal Reserve Bank: +10 credit (+20 profit, - 10 running cost)
Public Housing: -10 credits (+20 profit, -30 running cost)

Expenditure: -330 credits
Defense: -20 credits
—Army: -10
—Navy & Marines: -5
—Air Force: -5
Social Protection: -49 credits
—Pensions: -11
—Income Support: -12
—Housing Subsidies: -8
—Family Allowances: -7
—Food Stamps: -5
—Orphans: -3
—Disability: -3
Health: -50 credits
—Health Insurance: -37
—Hospitals: -9
—Wages: -4
Education: -40 credits
—Public Schools: -23
—Private Subsidies: -6
—Colleges & Universities: -5
—Wages: -6
Public Order: -17 credits
—Police: -4
—Police Wages: -2
—Courts: -3
—Court Wages: -1
—Prisons: -4
—Prison Wages: -1
Infrastructure: -44 credits
—Road Maintenance: -9
—Railroad Subsidies: -10
—Airport Subsidies: -5
—Water Costs: -10
—Water Imports: -10
Industry: -9 credits
—Subsidies: -3
—Loans: -4
—Regulation: -2
Agriculture: -21 credits
—Subsidies: -15
—Loans: -5
—Education: -1
Energy: -50 credits
—Subsidies: -10
—PSA Imports: -17
—USA Imports: -14
—Canada Imports: -9
Government: -14 credits
—State: -6
—Local: -4
—Administrative: -2
—Wages: -2
Veterans: -9 credits
—Pensions: -4
—Education: -2
—Rehabilitation: -2
—Loans: -1
Science & Technology: -12 credits
—Defense: -5
—Health: -3
—General Science: -2
—Agriculture: -1
—Energy: -1
Culture: -5 credits
—Art: -1
—Music: -1
—Humanities: -1
—Literature: -1
—Other: -1
Debt Interest: 0 credits

Debt: 200 credits (50 owed to USA, 50 owed to PSA, 100 owed to domestic banks)
Interest rate: 20% per annum
Interest Payments: 0 credits per annum
Debt Ceiling: 400 credits

Private Sector: +550
Major Industries:
Power: +40 credits
Telecommunications: +50 credits
Transportation: +60 credits
Oil and Gas: +120 credits
Mining: +90 credits
Manufacturing: +60 credits
Agriculture: +100 credit

OTHER: +30 credits

Trade Unionism and Labor Rules

Trade Unions: 42.5% working population unionised.
Right to organise and collectively bargain protected by legislation. Child labour laws in place. Right to strike protected and largely unlimited; with no ballot required, no limits on supporting strikes, and no limits on flying pickets.

Congress of Industrial and Agricultural Organizations - Represents 20.7% working population. Progressive Party aligned, particularly the Liberal faction. Draws support from primarily from agriculture, with less representation in oil, mining, manufacturing, etc. Solid backing from service and public sector workers.
Workers’ International Union - Represents 21.8% working population. Socialist Party aligned, spread across the whole spectrum. Strong representation in industry, especially oil and natural gas, mining, and manufacturing of all sorts.

Minimum wage in place set by federal government, must be raised by Congress. States may set their own minimum wages in accordance with federal law.
Federal Minimum Wage: 70% Living Wage, 20% for tipped workers
Retirement Age: 66

Life:

Health: Fully subsidised universal healthcare, based around a compulsory social insurance plan. Hospital standards are high and provide comprehensive healthcare to most of the population, although waiting times and inefficiencies are high. Majority of hospitals privately owned and run. Health issues faced by the population primarily include obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and other non-infectious disease. Growing instances of drug abuse-related illness. Abortion rights fall under the right to privacy (Doe v. Wade), and is permitted until viability (except for health reasons). Average life expectancy: 76.
Housing: Urban population continues to grow due to mechanisation of substantial agricultural sector. Particularly in southern cities (NM, OK, AK, LA, TX), overcrowding is growing and standards of living are slipping, resulting in inner city poverty. Seriously falling standards of living continue to affect the Native American population.
Water: Clean, safe water provided to ~100% of population. Reservoirs throughout the country, primarily in the Missouri River watershed. Imports some fresh water from Canada to meet demands (20-45%, depending on needs).
Electricity: Net power importer. Exports oil, natural gas, and coal to the PSA and USA to meet their energy needs, while importing cheaper electricity in return due to treaty limitations on MSA power production capacity. MSA-based stations produce 30% energy needs, 30% from PSA plants, 25% from USA plants, 15% from Canadian plants. Processes Mexican oil and coal into energy and derivative products, which it sells back to Mexico (65% Mexican energy needs). Energy demands rising.
Education: 97.3% literacy. Universal primary education. 73% secondary enrolment rate, capacity to handle 90%. 21% university enrolment rate, capacity to handle 39%.
Transportation: Extensive transport links throughout the country. Air transportation services domestic and international passenger and cargo flights. Most common services to Mexico, the Caribbean, Australasia, the PSA and USA. Unofficial national carrier is Transcontinental & Western Air (TWA). Highways connect states all across the nation, with high private car ownership. Extensive privately owned rail services, primarily taking cargo throughout North America, with most private operators maintaining some passenger lines, despite declining profits.
Religion: 76% Christian (42% Protestant, 33% Catholic), 16% Unaffiliated, 8.4% Jewish, 0.6% Other
Ethnicities: 65.2% White, 19.1% Hispanic, 13.6% Black, 1.1% Asian (incl. 0.4% Japanese-Americans), 0.6% Native American, 0.4% Other
Crime: Crime is growing (5%), especially in urban areas. Rising fastest is violent crime (56% of reported crimes). Most common crimes are theft, robbery, and assault. Petty crime such as shoplifting and pickpocketing remains low. Prostitution remains illegal in all states so far. Drug related crimes are also on the rise (17%). Speculation is growing that organised crime from Latin America and Asia (via the PSA) is spreading in the MSA.
Enforcement: States operate their own police services. Federal level coast guard, army, navy, air force, and marine corps. Military limited by Treaty of Saint Paul to “a force incapable of waging offensive war against its neighbours and disturbing the balance of peace”. This has been interpreted as prohibiting ICBMs, nuclear weapons, aircraft carriers, amphibious craft, and strategic bombers - a view supported by neighbours. Often made/coerced to purchase US/German and PS/Japanese military equipment, often in outdated formats.
Navy: Largely refitted late-war ships, supplemented with some ships bought from Mexico. 60 ships - 1 battleship, 6 destroyers, 6 frigates, 5 corvettes, 8 fast attack craft, 10 mine countermeasure craft, 4 small submarines, 20 misc ships. Marines (7,500 active, 500 reserve) see limited use due to perceived limitations on amphibious warfare.
Air Force: Primarily supplied by McDonnell Aircraft, an almost entirely fighter-based force. No dedicated bombers, only fighter-bombers at best. Some 400 aircraft, 200 of which are combat aircraft. Remainder includes AEW, trainer, and transport.
Army: 170,000 active servicemen, 10,000 main reserve, 20,000 secondary reserve. Largely outdated small arms purchased from USA/PSA. Armored components better matched through indigenous development, though presently lagging 7 years behind neighbors.
Intelligence: Most intelligence work done by four main agencies - the Office of Strategic Services (under the Presidency), the Armed Forces Security Agency (under the Defence Department), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (under the Justice Department), and the Mountain States Secret Service (under the Treasury Department).

Huojin
General Secretary
General Secretary
Posts: 3354
Joined: 07:30:29 Thursday, 02 August, 2012

Re: News Bulletin

Post by Huojin » 17:55:56 Sunday, 01 February, 2015

News

*Sparking memories of the 1971-72 Isle Royal Skirmishes in the Great Lakes, not to mention the suspicious sinking of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald in 1975, Mountain States Coast Guard vessels report a US Navy fast attack craft penetrated past the international border in Lake Superior into waters under the jurisdiction of the State of Minnesota. They reportedly made it some 30 nautical miles (approximately 55 kms) into MSA waters, harassing fishing and cargo vessels along the way, before their presence was discovered and they withdrew.
*A bill proposing a volunteer corps to help struggling nations is viewed positively, with many in the public seeing it as a useful way to help out allies. However concerns over protection, funding, placement in government hierarchy, economic issues at home, sourcing recruits, and so on, both hold up the Senate proposal and divide wider public opinion. Comments regarding a need to fix the budget first float around.
*In some of the most controversial news so far this year, Congressman Shinoda, member of House Committee on Un-American Activities, calls for an investigation into the President’s past - with particular attention paid to his time spent in France in the diplomatic service. Although he states he bears no ill-will against the President, and is in fact a member of his own Party, Shinoda claims it’s an important standard to set. Although this is proposal is regarded with shock by the public initially, the President’s popularity dipping as attention is called to his past, President Stone’s first interview conducted with The Kansas City Star’s own John Friedman clears the issue up. He welcomes the investigation, and persuaded by his eloquence the public likewise warms. Nevertheless, both this rise in the President’s polling and subsequent defeat in HUAC leaves Shinoda reeling slightly, his own poll numbers being less than encouraging. An investigation remains on the table, with HUAC motioning to present the House itself with a proposal to form a special committee.
*It’s leaked to the press that Cesar Manzano (R), a Catholic Representative from the state of Texas, considered extending an invitation to His Holiness Pope Gregory XVII to make a formal visit. Despite the state’s relatively high Catholic population, this has been viewed controversially throughout both Texas and the Mountain States as a whole due to the perceived influence over the selection of the Pope by fascist European nations. It remains unclear whether such an invitation has been made, or would even have been accepted, although the Pope did make a notable visit to Brazil late last year.
*Mountain States Coast Guard cutters report that they are intercepting thousands of Haitian refugees on makeshift rafts, fleeing the violence and disaster-stricken areas. Various clashes have been reported between these refugees and the United States Coast Guard, who reports indicate are shepherding the rafts (by means of bow waves and machine gun fire) towards Mountain American waters. So far the Coast Guard has rounded them up and contained them in refugee camps just in-land on the Louisiana coast with the Louisiana National Guard surrounding the camps.
*A number of Republican Conservative candidates begin appearing in the media - from leading figures like Representative Carpenter and Senators Clayton and Morris on national television, to lesser figures on talk radio and local newspapers. They’re widely found commending the Republican Party and its supporters during the hard-fought campaign, and making various comments regarding their own legislative agendas. Unofficial caucus head, Matthew Carpenter, begins writing a weekly op-ed column in The Oklahoman. For the most part, this increased media presence goes smoothly. One notable gaffe, however, occurs when Congressman Warner comments offhandedly on talk radio regarding his fellow HUAC-member, Congressman Shinoda. The disparaging comments related to the Congressman’s ethnic origin as a Japanese-American.
*A minor incident in an impoverished urban area of Kansas City devolves into a full-blown street fight between rival gangs, noted by observers as being black and white. The incident is swiftly broken up by police forces in the capital, but not before three black youths and two white end up in hospital with serious injuries, but stable conditions.
*The Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC), appointed by President Cargo towards the end of his term, releases a preliminary conclusion in February that the incarceration of Japanese Americans during the war was “a grave injustice” - a conclusion widely welcomed by the Japanese American Citizens League, but gravely opposed by certain elements of the far right and left, who have alternately claimed it a serious necessity during a time of war, decreeing that apologists in the present are “cowards” and “fascist sympathisers”.
*Congressman Nordquist was heard to remark, according to a highly placed member of his personal staff, of his determination to “save the bison”. The American bison’s longstanding place as the mascot of the Progressive Party no doubt playing some part in this decision, some Progressive congressmen later noted with surprise the allocation of the Department of the Interior by the President to Brendan Moskin, a Socialist candidate for the job.
*Remarks by President George Wallace of the United States of America make their way into Mountain States press. The comments pertain to the cabinet appointments made by President Stone, including “a negro Secretary of State” who Wallace doubts “is able to tie his shoes, let alone run the State Department”, and what he terms the “ironic” appointment of a “Christ killing Jew” to the Department of Veteran Affairs. The remarks are widely derided, but cause some press affairs difficulties for the State and Veterans Affairs offices when questions regarding them inevitably arise. While Secretary Jacobs remained merely put-out, Secretary Crocker made some far more inflammatory remarks, referring to President Wallace as “a cowardly fascist bootlicker”. Needless to say, the United States government took the declaration poorly.
*The markets as a whole trend downwards, with less growth that previously anticipated. Some analysts put this down to the appointment of a Progressive Liberal as Labor Secretary - not to mention the former Vice President for the United Food and Commercial Workers union. Fears over pro-labor, anti-business legislation or agendas from the administration stifle some activity. However this is offset slightly by the appointment of a Progressive Conservative former-Chairman of the Chamber of Commerce as Treasury Secretary, prompting hopes that this government will not be excessively left-leaning. The inclusion of Mr Cabrini, a Republican, as the Secretary of Defense also raises speculations of a more bipartisan future.
*Nevertheless, the situation is not aided by the lack of a new budget. With the Cargo administration’s budget leaving the country running at an annual deficit of 60 credits, many were hoping for new proposals that would cut back or eliminate this. Credit rating agencies downgrade the Mountain States economic outlook, dropping from Positive to merely Stable.
*In specific economic news - McDonnell stock recovers slightly as a result of HR.2 currently sitting before the House of Representatives, although its languishing in the Appropriations Committee does leave some uncertainty. Both Marathon Oil Company and Standard Oil of California take hits as a result of HUAC investigations being launched, SOCAL’s being the worst after a rigorous interrogation of Regional Director Luis Iwasaki Calderon.
*Conoco’s headquarters in Oklahoma are filled with cautious optimism as they pick up some of SOCAL’s business exporting oil and other products westwards to the PSA. However the company’s past as having been based in Utah before a merger prompts some worries they may be next on some hidden hit list.
*Anaconda Mining’s profits continue to subside, and as investor concern continues to grow their stock continues its slump.
*Despite a Cabinet deemed left-leaning by the markets, an unnamed source within Wallace House indicated that the Vice President is greatly displeased by its disposition, referring to it as “treacherous”. The Vice President’s office has been unavailable for comment.
*Edwin Michael Scott, leader of the Greater United American Way Party, announces a condemnation of the House Un-American Affairs Committee (HUAC) for their rampant anti-capitalist agenda, which he states to be the direct result of “having turned the committee’s purpose from hunting communists to helping them gain high office” - referring to the left-wing slant demonstrated in both the House and, correspondingly, the committee.
*At May Department Stores locations across the country, especially those where the staff know their profits are falling, minor striking is witnessed in protest against the layoffs. Despite many in the service sector belonging to the CIAO, they are supported by fellow trade unionists from the WIU, striking in support of them. Despite statements by management that a policy of voluntary redundancy is all that is being offered right now, the striking fails to subside, and stocks in May continue to fall.
*Having retired from his position as Chairman of the Federal Reserve this time last year, Martin Dorian publishes a new academic book. A former corporate CFO, ex-Chair of the Federal Reserve Bank of St Louis, and originally a Republican appointee to begin with, Dorian appears to have drifted towards the political right, devoting large sections of his book to advocating for a return to the gold standard. The Mountain States have historically maintained a substantial gold reserve after moving the former-US gold reserves inland to Denver as invasion threatened, as well as holding on to parts of evacuated European reserves.
*Louisiana and Texas see some activity, though, with WIU-owned cooperatives opening in the two states. The two companies - Red Express Cooperative Enterprise (a shipping and freight company) and Zeidler Supplies Cooperative Enterprise (a general store) - open on a small, regional-only scale, earning modest business, any profits from which are turned over back into the business or used to bolster employee salaries. At an opening ceremony in Corpus Christi, Texas, in front of a brand new store with a truck outside it, Vice President Roux-Johnson himself is seen in attendance, hailing cooperatives as the economic unit of the future. The entire Texan Socialist caucus attends, as well as, surprisingly, three Progressive representatives.
*Yet despite this politically-star-studded opening, the cooperatives get off to a slow start to business. Turn-over is low, and although local communities seem encouraged to support their local shops, and wages are decent, when all is said and done the businesses have relatively little to show for it all so far.
*The Electable Progressives Organization, sponsored by their Conservative caucus, is founded to rally funding for candidates of a moderate persuasion. They attract primarily business owners who, although not necessarily socially conservative, want a less restrictive economic policy than traditionally offered by the Moderates, Liberals, and Hard Left. The EPO assists in the establishment of a bus tour fundraising campaign to call for economic rationality. Although so soon after the November elections the tour raises relatively little, it raises the profile of calls for economic reform, especially in light of the continuing downturn.
*With Congressional efforts to sent help to Haiti stalling and no aid considered for Mexico, the MSA’s major ally to the south, several hundred protesters gather outside the offices of Senators and Representatives in Austin, Texas and Santa Fe, New Mexico, calling for their congressmen to take a stand with the Mexican people. Some commentators mention that Mexico’s economy is strong enough on its own, whilst the MSA is undergoing its own economic issues.
*Compounding failures by Congress so early on in the year, public opinion goes quite rabid over the total failure of either party to secure much-needed aid to help out American citizens in Texas and Louisiana who were suffering from millions of dollars worth of damage. Notably opinions of both Socialists and Republicans stand up better, due to their at least limited contributions, but Progressives fair poorly as the party in government.
*Trade union news sheets confirm the sightings of representatives from the Labour Party in the Commonwealth, the Party of the Mexican Revolution, the Workers’ Party of Cuba, and even the odd African National Congress member, touring the Socialist Party’s offices in Kansas City. They are notably accompanied by Socialist Representative to the House, Arthur Robertson. The news sheets, which praise the respective parties for their “socialist accomplishments”, hint at a wider dialogue about the meaning of socialism today, encompassing its past, present, and future. Controversy is nevertheless aroused in the political scene, what with the Labour Party undergoing yet another series of corruption scandals back home, and the ANC’s questionable left-wing credentials at all.
*For the first time, amongst new undergraduates at the Mountain States Military Academy at Leavenworth, Asian-Americans exceeded the number of African-Americans - by 9% to 7%. This is despite the far larger African-American population in the MSA (13.6% to 1.1%).
*Pro-labor movement comics begin appearing cheaply on newsstands across the country, painting figures like Eugene Debs and “Big Bill” Haywood as heroes of the working man. One issue even covers Toledano’s exploits in Mexico, though notably fails to mention revolutions. They prove popular enough amongst already left wing households, with parents buying them for their kids, but with little impact outside of that.
*A series of pamphlets entitled “Socialist Notes” begins distribution throughout the country in a monthly series. Over the beginning of the year, it covers three main topics: “Cooperatives and the Syndicalist Strategy: A New Model for a New Tomorrow”; “The Fascist Iron Snake”; and “Trails of Tears”. They prove a big hit on campuses, where young voters, as always, remain open to radicalisation and politicisation.
*Senator Philip Donovan meets with leaders of the American Indian Movement (AIM), in Oklahoma. Openly dismissive of Progressives initiatives over the years to help Native causes, he calls for real focus on Indian issues, demanding better public services and jobs for unemployed Amerindians.
*A Young Peoples Socialist League Congress is announced for early in the summer, with the event being promoted in schools and colleges across the country. Ahead of the congress, a storm of activity is witnessed amongst YPSL members, who begin utilising study circles to organize, holding regional cadre schools, and pushing membership through promotion in campuses across the MSA, especially in places like Missouri and Iowa, normally beyond Socialist influence. They remain so, of course, but not for want of trying. After weeks of door-knocking and mixers, some begin calling the YPSL representatives “the new Mormons”.
*Joanna Nelson, the recently elected Progressive Senator from Montana, is selected by her peers to serve as President Pro Tempore.

International News

*Three separate ships - a commercial trawler, a cargo ship, and a collier - sailing into Chesapeake Bay in the USA explode over the course of two and a half months, resulting in the loss of more than 30 of those onboard. The rest were rescued after the sinking of the ships by the United States Coast Guard. The Black Liberation Army issues a statement claiming responsibility for the attacks, prompting a condemnation of “the brutality and inhumanity” of sinking civilian ships by US President Wallace.
*Rebels in Nicaragua launch a major offensive, counting on the Somoza government’s forces to be heavily demoralised by major fighting towards the end of last year. However their fortunes see a reversal, as they spend the best part of three months blunting the tip of their spearhead towards the capital against bolstered defences, including some layers of fortified lines set in place along their very obvious route to the capital.
*A substantial earthquake hits Sichuan Province in the Republic of China, killing some 150 people. The Japanese government is said to have sent aid workers to assist in the recovery in the natural disaster-wracked region, as well as troops to protect them where accosted by locals (be they disgruntled farmers or incensed militias).
*A Chilean passenger ferry heading around Cape Horn to Argentina sinks in the southern Atlantic Ocean, killing more than 500 on board. No foul play is suspected, although a government investigation has been launched.
*In the Italian province of Achaia, a powerful earthquake hits, leaving 22 dead, 400 injured, and over 4000 buildings and houses destroyed. Duce Giorgio Almirante announces that immediate help will be sent to provide for those in danger, though quite what “immediate” means for the Almirante government…
*Bobby Seale, noted black rights activist and leader in the Pacific States imprisoned for what he claims were “non-violent protests against an oppressive state”, announces a hunger strike at the end of March. He is joined, over the course of several days, by numerous other black inmates, who claim to be political prisoners or prisoners of war, rather than criminals.
*A small protest, numbering some 20 to 30 individuals leads to an increased presence by Pacific State kempeitai outside the Mountain States embassy in Sacramento, more than doubling their numbers. This necessitates the cancellation by the ambassador of numerous meetings.
*Pennzoil stocks fall slightly on the New York Stock Exchange as news reaches the markets that the Mountain American House Un-American Activities Committee has launched an investigation into their activities alongside Marathon Oil. They recover slightly at the announcement by a spokesperson for the CEO that all expansion plans have been placed on hold. The markets were not, however, entirely satisfied and continued to express their displeasure over perceived threats to the oil pipeline operated by the Marathon Oil Company that passes from Canada, through the MSA, in order to reach the USA.
*The United States of America launches a formal complaint with the League of Nations, petitioning that Mexico, the Commonwealth, and the MSA be compelled by the Assembly to reveal the details of their tripartite project for the CNEE, citing that if it is a dangerous nuclear weapons program, the world ought to know and put a stop to it.
*With no end to the chaos in sight, despite aid being sent from Cuba, Haiti falls deeper into crisis. With the government unable to provide any form of actual governance outside urban areas, where it nevertheless is still struggling with a humungous homelessness crisis, rural areas continue their descent into chaos. In many areas the Tonton Macoutes have taken advantage of the aimlessness and lack of security to begin drawing additional recruits, even from children and teenagers whose parents have died or they have been separated from. With these bolstered forces, numerous areas of warlordic control spring up in rural areas, with little sign of stopping.
*Mexico continues to cope with its own disasters, and despite a lack of support from its major northern ally, the Mountain States, makes headway in providing temporary housing for tens of thousands of those affected by the crisis. Nevertheless, the situation remains dire, with many Mexican politicians reproaching the MSA for not doing more to help.

Mountain States of America
Image

Motto: None
Map: http://i.imgur.com/XdRSari.png
Date: Q1 1981
Population: 46,379,782
Capital: Kansas City

Government:
Executive power vested in the Cabinet, headed by the President. The President is chosen by indirect elections every four years by the Electoral College, running with the Vice President on the same electoral “ticket”. The Cabinet is chosen and serves at the President’s pleasure, and is confirmed by the Senate.

Popularity: 56/100 (-20 honeymoon period over, -5 HUAC investigation, +6 interview)

President: Charles E Stone (P-M) - Smyg
Vice President: Paul Roux-Johnson (S) - OYID

Secretary of State: Joseph Crocker (P-H)
Secretary of the Treasury: Robert Eskolm (P-C)
Secretary of Defense: Joseph Cabrini (R-N)
Attorney General: Bradley O'Hara (P-L)
Secretary of the Interior: Brendan Moskin (S)
Secretary of Agriculture: Amelia Delacruz (P-L)
Secretary of Commerce: Claire Edwards (P-M)
Secretary of Labor: Charles Hayes (P-L)
Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare: Mathias Oliver (P-M)
Secretary of Veterans Affairs: Jack H. Jacobs (P-H)

Next Presidential Election: Q4 1984


Legislative power vested in the Mountain States Congress, divided into the Senate (upper chamber) and the House of Representatives (lower chamber). The Senate is chosen by staggered elections every 2 years, divided into 3 classes which are chosen every 6 years. The House of Representatives are re-elected as a whole every 2 years.

Mountain States Senate

President pro tempore: Joanna Nelson (P-M)
Senate Majority Leader: Nathan Hanlon (P-H) - Snacks
Senate Majority Whip: XXX
Senate Minority Leader: Franklin Weeks (R-M) - Maddox
Senate Minority Whip: XXX

Progressives: 14
—Progressive Moderates: 5
—Progressive Liberals: 2
—Progressive Hard Left: 2
—Progressive Conservatives: 5

Republicans: 12
—Republican Moderates: 5
—Republican Conservatives: 3
—Republican Liberals: 3
—Republican Neo-Conservatives: 1

Socialists: 4
—Socialist: 3
—Socialist Workers: 1

Mountain States House of Representatives

Speaker of the House: Anthony C Nordquist (P-L) - Gesar
House Majority Leader: XXX
House Majority Whip: XXX
House Minority Leader: Matthew J Carpenter (R-C) - Coinneach
House Minority Whip: Esteban Perez (R-C)

Progressives: 41
—Progressive Moderates: 10
—Progressive Liberals: 14
—Progressive Hard Left: 11
—Progressive Conservatives: 6

Republicans: 35
—Republican Moderates: 12
—Republican Conservatives: 13
—Republican Liberals: 4
—Republican Neo-Conservatives: 6

Socialists: 14
—Socialist: 10
—Socialist Workers: 4

Next House of Representatives Election: Q4 1982
Next Senate Class I Election: Q4 1986
Next Senate Class II Election: Q4 1982
Next Senate Class III Election: Q4 1984


Political Parties:

Progressive Party
—Progressive Moderates [Social Liberalism, Progressivism] - Jose Marquez - Smyg
—Progressive Liberals [Progressivism, Trade Unionism] - Anthony C Nordquist - Gesar
—Progressive Hard Left [Democratic Socialism, Leftist] - Nathan Hanlon - Snacks
—Progressive Conservatives [Neoliberalism, Centre-rightist] - Orval Scott - Litos

Republican Party
—Republican Moderates [Social Conservatism, Centre-rightist] - Franklin Weeks - Maddox
—Republican Conservatives [Conservative, Rightist] - Matthew J Carpenter - Coinneach
—Republican Liberals [Social Conservatism, Centrist] - Christopher Miller - RinKou
—Republican Neo-Conservatives [Neoconservatism, Firm Anti-fascism] - Leanna J Freeman ykl

Socialist Party
—Socialist [Socialism, Leftist, Trade Unionism] - Philip Donovan - OYID
—Socialist Workers [Far Left, Pro-Mexico, Toledanist]

Minor Parties:
Workers’ Revolutionary Party [Toledanist, Trotskyist, Anti-Mexico]
Constitutionalist Party [Nationalism, Paleoconservatism, Rightist]
Communist Party USA [Communism, Marxism, Anti-fascism]
Greater United American Way Party [Pro-PSA, Pro-Japan, Militarism, Statism]
American People’s Unity Party [Pro-USA, Pro-German, National Socialism, White Supremacism]


States: 15

Montana
Population: 786,690

Senators:
Republican-M - Class II
Progressive-M - Class I
Representatives: 2
1 Republican - 1 Republican-N
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-M

Overview: Source of some of the largest copper deposits in the world, as well as gold, silver and coal mining. Lumber felling also a source of income.

Wyoming
Population: 469,557

Senators:
Republican-M - Class I
Republican-C - Class II
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-N

Overview: Produces coal, natural gas, oil and uranium, supplemented by agricultural efforts, including livestock, grains, and wool.

Colorado
Population: 2,889,964

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class I
Republican-N - Class III
Representatives: 6
3 Republican - 1 Republican-M, 1 Republican-C, 1 Republican-N
3 Progressive - 2 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-M

Overview: Contains substantial gold and silver mines, as well as natural gas and oil drilling. Machinery and industry also present in large concentrations. Cattle and dairy also common.

New Mexico
Population: 1,303,302

Senators:
Socialist - Class II
Socialist - Class I
Representatives: 3
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-H
1 Republican - 1 Republican-C
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Home to substantial Hispanic population, as a result of Latin American immigration from allied countries. Also holds some of the largest concentrations of Asians in the MSA, a combination of those who fled the war on the Pacific Coast, and more recent immigrants. Growing gang violence and organised crime in urban areas. Substantial copper and uranium mines, as well as oil and natural gas drilling. Agricultural produce includes chiles, pecans, potatoes, and livestock.

North Dakota
Population: 652,717

Senators:
Republican-M - Class III
Republican-L - Class I
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-M

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing cereals, buckwheat, corn, and oilseeds.

South Dakota
Population: 690,768

Senators:
Republican-M - Class II
Republican-C - Class III
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-C

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, corn, wheat, and soybeans. Also holds tourism draws, such as Mt. Rushmore.

Nebraska
Population: 1,569,825

Senators:
Republican-C - Class I
Republican-L - Class III
Representatives: 3
3 Republican - 1 Republican-M, 1 Republican-C, 1 Republican-N

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, corn, and soybeans.

Kansas
Population: 2,363,679

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class III
Republican-L - Class I
Representatives: 5
3 Progressive - 1 Progressive-M, 1 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-L
1 Republican - 1 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Shares the capital city with Missouri. Outside of the thriving urban centre, primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, wheat, soybeans, cotton, and more.

Oklahoma
Population: 3,025,290

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class II
Socialist - Class III
Representatives: 6
5 Republican - 3 Republican-M, 2 Republican-C
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-H

Overview: Hosts the largest concentration of Native Americans in the MSA, as well as a growing Hispanic population as new immigrants make their way north from the border states. Substantial aviation industry interests, as well as oil and natural gas. Largely secondary agricultural sector, including livestock, dairy and wheat.

Texas
Population: 14,229,191

Senators:
Progressive-H - Class I
Progressive-M - Class II
Representatives: 27
11 Progressive - 6 Progressive-H, 3 Progressive-M, 2 Progressive-L
9 Republican - 4 Republican-C, 2 Republican-M, 2 Republican-N, 1 Republican-L
7 Socialist - 5 Socialist, 2 Socialist-W

Overview: Most economically powerful state, producing substantial oil and natural gas. Also home to livestock farming, fisheries, and some crops including cereals and cotton. Has seen growing Hispanic population as immigration (legal and illegal) from allied Latin American countries increases.

Minnesota
Population: 4,075,970

Senators:
Progressive-L - Class I
Progressive-M - Class II
Representatives: 8
5 Progressive - 4 Progressive-L, 1 Progressive-M
2 Republican - 2 Republican-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Substantial agricultural producer, including sugar beets, sweetcorn, poultry, and lumber.

Iowa
Population: 2,913,808

Senators:
Progressive-L - Class II
Republican-M - Class III
Representatives: 6
3 Republican - 3 Republican-C
2 Progressive - 1 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Substantial agricultural producer, including livestock, dairy products, corn, and other crops.

Missouri
Population: 4,916,686

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class I
Progressive-C - Class III
Representatives: 9
6 Progressive - 3 Progressive-L, 2 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-M
2 Republican - 1 Republican-L, 1 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Shares the capital city with Kansas. Gateway transportation hub between the USA and MSA. Home to substantial aviation industry, as well as light manufacturing and lead and limestone mining.

Arkansas
Population: 2,286,435

Senators:
Progressive-H - Class II
Progressive-M - Class III
Representatives: 4
3 Progressive - 2 Progressive-H, 1 Progressive-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist-W

Overview: Strong Southern identity, yet also home to substantial black population. Notable for production of cotton, lumber, automobiles and bauxite.

Louisiana:
Population: 4,205,900

Senators:
Progressive-M - Class II
Socialist-W - Class III
Representatives: 8
5 Progressive - 2 Progressive-M, 2 Progressive-L, 1 Progressive-H
2 Republican - 2 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist-W

Overview: Substantial black population, primarily from post-war refugees and illegal immigrants from the USA. Remaining French influence from colonial era. Has substantial fishing, livestock and agriculture sectors, in addition to industrial sectors producing paper, petroleum and chemicals. Also notable for its film industry (the Hollywood of the South).


Economy:
Finance: Mountain Federal Reserve Bank based in Kansas City issues the Mountain States Dollar (MSD), derived from the old US dollar.

Services: 36.1% GDP, 26.7% labour force. Substantial spread over the sector; main contributors include real estate, aviation, tourism, and transport. 85% private, 10% joint-venture, 5% state-owned.
Industry: 43.9% GDP, 39.1% labour force. Primarily based in mining (copper, gold, silver, coal, sulphur, etc), and oil and gas drilling. Slightly lesser contribution from manufacturing. 70% private, 20% joint-venture, 10% state-owned.
Agriculture: 20.0% GDP, 29.2% labour force. Increasingly dominated by large companies and businesses. Improving mechanisation also leading to falling employment in this sector. 95% private, 5% joint-venture.
Unemployment: 5% (1.7% frictional, 3.3% structural)

Credit Rating: AA
Outlook: Stable

Government Budget
Treasury: 200 credits
Gold Reserves: [yet to be audited, >500]
Surplus: -15 (315 Revenue - 330 Expenditure)

Revenue: +315

Tax: +275 credits
Income Tax: +110
—Working Class - Somewhat Low: +48
—Middle Class - Somewhat Low: +36
—Upper Class - Moderate: +26

Social Insurance: +82 credits

Corporation Tax: +55 credits (550 Private Sector/10) [rounded up]

Trade Tariffs: +28
USA: +6 credits
PSA: +6 credits
Canada: +6 credits
Mexico: +10 credits


Public Corporations: +40
Post Service: -10 credit (+0 profit - 10 running cost)
State-owned industry: +30 credit (+50 profit - 20 running cost)
State-owned services: +20 credits (+40 profit, -20 running cost)
Mountain Federal Reserve Bank: +10 credit (+20 profit, - 10 running cost)
Public Housing: -10 credits (+20 profit, -30 running cost)

Expenditure: -330 credits
Defense: -20 credits
—Army: -10
—Navy & Marines: -5
—Air Force: -5
Social Protection: -49 credits
—Pensions: -11
—Income Support: -12
—Housing Subsidies: -8
—Family Allowances: -7
—Food Stamps: -5
—Orphans: -3
—Disability: -3
Health: -50 credits
—Health Insurance: -37
—Hospitals: -9
—Wages: -4
Education: -40 credits
—Public Schools: -23
—Private Subsidies: -6
—Colleges & Universities: -5
—Wages: -6
Public Order: -17 credits
—Police: -4
—Police Wages: -2
—Courts: -3
—Court Wages: -1
—Prisons: -4
—Prison Wages: -1
Infrastructure: -44 credits
—Road Maintenance: -9
—Railroad Subsidies: -10
—Airport Subsidies: -5
—Water Costs: -10
—Water Imports: -10
Industry: -9 credits
—Subsidies: -3
—Loans: -4
—Regulation: -2
Agriculture: -21 credits
—Subsidies: -15
—Loans: -5
—Education: -1
Energy: -50 credits
—Subsidies: -10
—PSA Imports: -17
—USA Imports: -14
—Canada Imports: -9
Government: -14 credits
—State: -5
—Local: -4
—Administrative: -2
—Wages: -2
—Intelligence: -1
Veterans: -9 credits
—Pensions: -4
—Education: -2
—Rehabilitation: -2
—Loans: -1
Science & Technology: -12 credits
—Defense: -5
—Health: -3
—General Science: -2
—Agriculture: -1
—Energy: -1
Culture: -5 credits
—Art: -1
—Music: -1
—Humanities: -1
—Literature: -1
—Other: -1
Debt Interest: 0 credits

Debt: 215 credits (55 owed to USA, 55 owed to PSA, 105 owed to domestic banks)
Interest rate: 20% per annum
Interest Payments: 0 credits per annum
Debt Ceiling: 400 credits

Private Sector: +550
Major Industries:
Power: +40 credits
Telecommunications: +50 credits
Transportation: +60 credits
Oil and Gas: +120 credits
Mining: +90 credits
Manufacturing: +60 credits
Agriculture: +100 credit

OTHER: +30 credits

Trade Unionism and Labor Rules

Trade Unions: 42.5% working population unionised.
Right to organise and collectively bargain protected by legislation. Child labour laws in place. Right to strike protected and largely unlimited; with no ballot required, no limits on supporting strikes, and no limits on flying pickets.

Congress of Industrial and Agricultural Organizations - Represents 20.7% working population. Progressive Party aligned, particularly the Liberal faction. Draws support from primarily from agriculture, with less representation in oil, mining, manufacturing, etc. Solid backing from service and public sector workers.
Workers’ International Union - Represents 21.8% working population. Socialist Party aligned, spread across the whole spectrum. Strong representation in industry, especially oil and natural gas, mining, and manufacturing of all sorts.

Minimum wage in place set by federal government, must be raised by Congress. States may set their own minimum wages in accordance with federal law.
Federal Minimum Wage: 70% Living Wage, 20% for tipped workers
Retirement Age: 66

Life:

Health: Fully subsidised universal healthcare, based around a compulsory social insurance plan. Hospital standards are high and provide comprehensive healthcare to most of the population, although waiting times and inefficiencies are high. Majority of hospitals privately owned and run. Health issues faced by the population primarily include obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and other non-infectious disease. Growing instances of drug abuse-related illness. Abortion rights fall under the right to privacy (Doe v. Wade), and is permitted until viability (except for health reasons). Average life expectancy: 76.
Housing: Urban population continues to grow due to mechanisation of substantial agricultural sector. Particularly in southern cities (NM, OK, AK, LA, TX), overcrowding is growing and standards of living are slipping, resulting in inner city poverty. Seriously falling standards of living continue to affect the Native American population.
Water: Clean, safe water provided to ~100% of population. Reservoirs throughout the country, primarily in the Missouri River watershed. Imports some fresh water from Canada to meet demands (20-45%, depending on needs).
Electricity: Net power importer. Exports oil, natural gas, and coal to the PSA and USA to meet their energy needs, while importing cheaper electricity in return due to treaty limitations on MSA power production capacity. MSA-based stations produce 30% energy needs, 30% from PSA plants, 25% from USA plants, 15% from Canadian plants. Processes Mexican oil and coal into energy and derivative products, which it sells back to Mexico (65% Mexican energy needs). Energy demands rising.
Education: 97.3% literacy. Universal primary education. 73% secondary enrolment rate, capacity to handle 90%. 21% university enrolment rate, capacity to handle 39%.
Transportation: Extensive transport links throughout the country. Air transportation services domestic and international passenger and cargo flights. Most common services to Mexico, the Caribbean, Australasia, the PSA and USA. Unofficial national carrier is Transcontinental & Western Air (TWA). Highways connect states all across the nation, with high private car ownership. Extensive privately owned rail services, primarily taking cargo throughout North America, with most private operators maintaining some passenger lines, despite declining profits.
Religion: 76% Christian (42% Protestant, 33% Catholic), 16% Unaffiliated, 8.4% Jewish, 0.6% Other
Ethnicities: 65.2% White, 19.1% Hispanic, 13.6% Black, 1.1% Asian (incl. 0.4% Japanese-Americans), 0.6% Native American, 0.4% Other
Crime: Crime is growing (5%), especially in urban areas. Rising fastest is violent crime (56% of reported crimes). Most common crimes are theft, robbery, and assault. Petty crime such as shoplifting and pickpocketing remains low. Prostitution remains illegal in all states so far. Drug related crimes are also on the rise (17%). Speculation is growing that organised crime from Latin America and Asia (via the PSA) is spreading in the MSA.
Enforcement: States operate their own police services. Federal level coast guard, army, navy, air force, and marine corps. Military limited by Treaty of Saint Paul to “a force incapable of waging offensive war against its neighbours and disturbing the balance of peace”. This has been interpreted as prohibiting ICBMs, nuclear weapons, aircraft carriers, amphibious craft, and strategic bombers - a view supported by neighbours. Often made/coerced to purchase US/German and PS/Japanese military equipment, often in outdated formats.
Navy: Largely refitted late-war ships, supplemented with some ships bought from Mexico. 60 ships - 1 battleship, 6 destroyers, 6 frigates, 5 corvettes, 8 fast attack craft, 10 mine countermeasure craft, 4 small submarines, 20 misc ships. Marines (7,500 active, 500 reserve) see limited use due to perceived limitations on amphibious warfare.
Air Force: Primarily supplied by McDonnell Aircraft, an almost entirely fighter-based force. No dedicated bombers, only fighter-bombers at best. Some 400 aircraft, 200 of which are combat aircraft. Remainder includes AEW, trainer, and transport.
Army: 170,000 active servicemen, 10,000 main reserve, 20,000 secondary reserve. Largely outdated small arms purchased from USA/PSA. Armored components better matched through indigenous development, though presently lagging 7 years behind neighbors.
Intelligence: Most intelligence work done by four main agencies - the Office of Strategic Services (under the Presidency), the Armed Forces Security Agency (under the Defence Department), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (under the Justice Department), and the Mountain States Secret Service (under the Treasury Department).

Huojin
General Secretary
General Secretary
Posts: 3354
Joined: 07:30:29 Thursday, 02 August, 2012

Re: News Bulletin

Post by Huojin » 21:23:43 Sunday, 01 February, 2015

BREAKING NEWS

March 30th, 1981


Returning to the Presidential limousine after a speech in the capital, President Stone and several men in his detail, including the Wallace House Press Secretary, a Secret Service agent, and a KC police officer, we shot and wounded by a rogue gunman waiting in the crowd outside. Squeezing off all six shots in his revolver in less than two seconds before being tackled by Secret Servicemen, the gunman was knocked down and the President bundled into the limousine in short order. However whilst travelling back to Wallace House for a medical check, it became apparent to agents travelling with the President that he had, in fact, been seriously wounded.

President Stone was rushed to Saint Luke’s Hospital of Kansas City, where it was discovered he had been shot in the chest and lower right arm, with a punctured lung and heavy internal bleeding. However despite being rushed into surgery quickly, lack of preparedness amongst both the Secret Service and the hospital’s staff led to delays. We regret to report that whilst in surgery, the President died from his wounds.

Within the hour, Vice President Roux Johnson - who had been on Capitol Hill, meeting with Senators - had been placed on board Marine Two, and rushed back to Wallace House, where he was met by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Michael F Cooke - a Republican appointee. In an atrium just inside the Wallace House, the Paul Roux Johnson took the Oath of Office, and was sworn in as the 42nd President, and the first Socialist President.

The thoughts and prayers of a nation remain with the family of President Stone. Godspeed.

Date: Q1 1981

Government:
Executive power vested in the Cabinet, headed by the President. The President is chosen by indirect elections every four years by the Electoral College, running with the Vice President on the same electoral “ticket”. The Cabinet is chosen and serves at the President’s pleasure, and is confirmed by the Senate.

Popularity: 26/100 (-15 not my President, -20 socialist, +5 smooth transition)

President: Paul Roux-Johnson (S) - OYID
Vice President: [vacant]

Secretary of State: Joseph Crocker (P-H)
Secretary of the Treasury: Robert Eskolm (P-C)
Secretary of Defense: Joseph Cabrini (R-N)
Attorney General: Bradley O'Hara (P-L)
Secretary of the Interior: Brendan Moskin (S)
Secretary of Agriculture: Amelia Delacruz (P-L)
Secretary of Commerce: Claire Edwards (P-M)
Secretary of Labor: Charles Hayes (P-L)
Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare: Mathias Oliver (P-M)
Secretary of Veterans Affairs: Jack H. Jacobs (P-H)

Next Presidential Election: Q4 1984

Huojin
General Secretary
General Secretary
Posts: 3354
Joined: 07:30:29 Thursday, 02 August, 2012

Re: News Bulletin

Post by Huojin » 23:46:36 Tuesday, 24 February, 2015

News

*Speaker of the House Anthony C Nordquist is nominated and confirmed as the 44th Vice President. Following his swearing in, he gave the following brief statement: “My friends, we have a lot of hard work ahead of us. But while the Republicans tell us that the man we voted for is “not our president”, and big business tries to stop the average American from helping this country reach its full potential, we'll remember this day as the day we set out to make a great country, greater.”
*His position as Speaker is taken by Majority Leader Jeannette Johnson (P-MO). Majority Whip Geoffrey Wise (P-IA) succeeds as Leader, with Cecelia Ortega (P-TX) becoming Whip.
*The “Not Our President” campaign, primarily an independent, right-wing movement, continues to attract attention. It is met, in return, by the full force of the “Yes, Our President” campaign - headed up by none other than the newly sworn-in Vice President, and Senate Majority Leader Nathan Hanlon. On national television spots and speech events around the country, and joined by local politicians, they bolster the President’s legitimacy and stress the strength of the Progressive-Socialist Coalition.
*This campaign is particularly boosted by Vice President Nordquist, who goes on a whirlwind tour around the country, stopping in Liberal strongholds, major cities, and even districts normally regarded as solid Republican territory. He attends meetings, town halls, and so on, stressing party unity and assuaging the worries of major Progressive backers. Back in Kansas City, he also establishes a new tradition of Thursday lunch meetings with the Vice President, allowing for question and answer sessions from important party figures, lobbyists, the media, and so on - from all parties. A more engaged Vice President, this country has not seen in some decades.
*Highlights of the campaign also include a May Day speech given by Senator Hanlon at a charity dinner in Dallas, a popularly received speech rousing support for the President and the Coalition.
*Following his ascension to the Vice Presidency, Anthony Nordquist reshapes his political action committee from a congressional-level body to a more nationally oriented one, named the Alliance for a Greater Future. It gathers some funding through fundraisers.
*Of more interest, perhaps is his support for an organisation established by activist friends and a former Liberal campaign manager or two - Democracy for America. A grassroots PAC, it draws funding and support from amongst students and working class Americans, focusing on training campaign staff from the ground up and giving the common man a voice in funding candidates they believe in.
*Congressman Robert Campbell, a Democratic Trotskyist and former militia fighter, pays a visit to Port-au-Prince, the Haitian capital. Upon his return, he recounts the extreme violence, poverty, and devastation in Haiti right now, become a prominent spokesperson for the efforts to get involved. He also uses his moments in the limelight to announce his upcoming memoirs about his time in Mexico, to be published by The Worker - where, incidentally, Senator Donovan will begin writing a weekly column.
*The media focuses heavily on the atrocities in Haiti, as well as the suffering in refugee camps and the international focus of the Socialist Party. Much of their discussion is also directed in opposition to the Republican Party, who they denounce as callous.
*The MS Coast Guard also deploys in force in the Great Lakes as the President gives a speech in Minnesota, declaring that MS American citizens cannot be bullied by “Segregationist thugs” and that the USA government “must apologize for this aggression”.
*Secretary of the Interior, Brendan Moskin, and Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, Mathias Oliver, hold a joint press conference, where they announce plans underway to assist the Haitian refugee camps in Louisiana. Coordinating with the CDC, they provide vaccination assistance, particularly to small children, and dietary aid - sending food, blankets, medicine, clean water, and so on. With the National Guard keeping order, all looks to be well, save for the continuing flow of refugees into the camps. Present estimates put the number of refugees at having just topped 10,000, with possibly as many as 15,000 present.
*President Roux-Johnson visits some of the refugee camps, escorted by National Guardsmen, witnessing first hand the conditions there, making use of his French skills (being a Louisiana native) to converse briefly with those taking shelter. He gives a speech at the camp, announcing aid to Haiti (while lamenting Congress’s failure to approve aid), condemning the Tonton Macoutes, and announcing the deployment of the National Guard and the Coast Guard to protect refugees and ensure makeshift rafts are safe from US harassment.
*Refugee advocacy groups present in the Louisiana camps are invited back to Wallace House with the President, where they conduct highly publicised meetings about their plans both domestically and abroad.
*The American Unity Initiative is founded - an umbrella NGO to unite and intercede between various dissident groups in the MSA assisting those trapped in the USA and PSA, and those escapees seeking refuge in the MSA. Including groups responsible for Radio Free America, and initiatives involved in smuggling popular classic The Grasshopper Lies Heavy into the USA, the left-leaning lobby group proves a popular draw for the disparate organisations. Plans for an American Unity National Congress are announced for Q3.
*In the aftermath of President Stone’s assassination, the news networks clamour to talk to those closest to him. Top of the list? Senator Jose Marquez, often described as his right hand man in Congress, and practically the brother he’d never had. Senator Marquez, building off both this sudden desirability, and his recent interview on Face The Nation with Congressman Matthew Carpenter, ties himself up in President Stone’s message - marking himself as dedicated to the same goals: remaining firm against the PSA and USA, tackling urban poverty, remaining a steadfast friend to the Hispanic and African American communities, and supportive of major public works projects. Although his performance on Face The Nation was criticised by some, others on the left blame Congressman Carpenter, for laying too severely into a man still reeling from the death of his close friend and mentor.
*An FBI investigation is officially launched into the assassination of President Charles Stone, as well as a further investigation, as President Roux-Johnson’s urging, into the rioting in Kansas City.
*President Roux-Johnson announces a series of Presidential pardons: for people convicted of breaking the Neutrality Act when assisting allies, and for unjustly jailed American Indians - whose he refers to as “historically dispossessed peoples” receiving “unfair and unequal treatment” in the justice system. Some pardons are also handed out for labor advocates punished for their roles in labor disputes - including, controversially, some with claimed ties to organized crime.
*Progressive Hard Left congressmen and senators make frequent visits to their home states, holding the normal fundraisers and speeches to maintain support, both for the party and the government. For many, it proves indicative of the growing need to raise funds earlier and earlier for electoral races, and of a move to shore up support for the Progressives, particularly in Socialist or Socialist-leaning districts.
*The Center for Disease Control reports that five homosexual men in Minneapolis have a rare form of pneumonia usually only found in elderly patients with severe immunosuppression.
*In New Orleans, ideal for its concentration of idealistic celebrities and impoverished artists, writers, actors, and so on, a new organisation called Socialist Artists United is founded, to unite the left wing art community. They engage in tertulia-style meetings of intellectuals and discussion, and tie into organising the left in the region, with plans to lobby for more cultural funding.
*As part of an anti-crime campaign in Houston after growing spate of crimes, police begin stopping and questioning hundreds of residents, primarily in the Third and Fifth Wards. After five days of building resentment in these areas facing serious socio-economic problems, the arrest of a young black man running away who was found to be bleeding seriously from a stab wound spirals out of control. With the police focused on apprehending him after he escapes twice, onlookers grow concerned he is not being given medical attention. They try to intervene, resulting in more police arriving to keep the crowds clear. Despite being taken to a hospital, rumours spread the youth had been left to die by police, prompting over 200 youths, both black and white, to turn on police.
*Despite these tensions, police operations continue for two more days, before rumours grow totally out of control, and with many in the community believing the youth to have died in police custody. Gathering crowds soon erupted into chaos, with police cars being pelted with bricks and rocks. Spiralling rapidly out of control, some 7,000 people took to the streets, with fires being set, stores looted, Molotov cocktails were thrown at police cars, and more. The rioting continued for two days, with the Governor of Texas ordering some 3,000 National Guardsmen into Houston to contain the situation. With a curfew imposed, the situation soon calmed down - the riot ending with some 17 dead, 300 injured, and some 500 arrested.
*Of note are some areas of Houston where Socialist Workers’ supporters tend to live, which remained markedly free of looting, after so-called “Neighborhood Self-Defense Corps”, a kind of armed neighbourhood watch/militia, fired shots when rioters attempted to enter the areas. These groups begin to spring up in Socialist Workers’ areas across the country, although the Houston branches remain under police investigation for any possible role in the four deaths in the area.
*With the passing of the Disaster Relief for Texas and Louisiana Act of 1981, a national day of mourning for the fallen is announced. Moreover, five credits of aid, sent by the President under Executive Order, is supervised and managed under the Act, focusing on rebuilding homes and businesses. The Act also encourages private charities and donations - a move supported by the Republican Conservatives, who hold fundraisers in all their states, donating funds to the rebuilding effort. After months of hard work and generosity, the damage is almost totally resolved - federal funds having been well placed.
*President Roux-Johnson signs an Executive Order, apportioning 2 credits worth of aid to Mexico in the form of humanitarian aid to the worst affected parts of the country. Travelling along with the initial aid shipments after giving a speech to the Mexican community in El Paso to gather their support, President Roux-Johnson also meets with President Martinez in Mexico City.
*The President also signs an Executive Order, sending 1 credits worth of aid to Haiti, including humanitarian aid and nonlethal military equipment for their armed forces. The Haitians are grateful, but request more aid urgently.
*Senator James E Graham (R-M) of Wyoming, at age 73, announces that despite his recent re-election, his health has taken a turn for the worse, and he will be retiring from politics. Turning to Governor Carl Bullock (R-N) to appoint a replacement, his Lieutenant Governor, Vernon Baker (R-M), volunteered to fill the spot. A popular choice, Bullock approves Baker’s selection. Newly-appointed Senator Baker proves to be a catalyst for major change in the Republican Moderate caucus, shaking up proceedings and pushing his way to the forefront of KC politics, emerging as a new de facto leader of the Moderate caucus.
*As investigations into Marathon Oil fizzle out, the company’s stock begins to recover on the market index. Not so for SOCAL - the investigation rages on, with Mr & Mrs Robert Stabler, former owners of QuikGas, and Mr Chester McDavis of James & James Land Surveyors testimonies to HUAC adding to the less intensive but still severe investigatory efforts into wrongdoing, further dragging down stock values.
*Fifteen coal miners are killed in an explosion at a Colorado coal mine. An investigation by the Colorado Bureau of Mines concludes the cause was a spark, possibly from a damaged cable, which ignited accumulated methane gas.
*Congressman Carpenter makes a trip to Montana towards the end of June, meeting with the Governor of Montana, Anthony Springer (R-M), as well as members of the state’s legislature, to discuss economic issues facing the state. Raising both concerns for the mining industry, and the transport industry, he spoke at a fundraiser held by Senator Butler, saying “the administration needs to wake up to the fact that states like Montana need a modern transport market to meet the demands of the modern world”, going on to praise reform efforts under Stassen and Cargo, while mentioning a “lack of leadership” from Roux-Johnson.
*In a brief legislative round up: plans for a volunteer corps fizzle out again, as amendment after amendment to the original bill is stymied by concerns regarding oversight. Bills have also been brought to the floor regarding gun control, stirring up substantial support in major gun-owning states, such as Wyoming, Montana, the Dakotas, and Arkansas, amongst others - nevertheless, the bill languishes in committee. A derivative bill proposed by the Socialist Party advocating for state-sponsored militias likewise remains in committee, though in the light of actions during the Houston Riots, they may gain some support.
*The MSA Gold Reserves Audit Act successfully passes through Congress, and with an audit being completed in relatively short order, the details have been passed on to those within the administration needing to be informed. A success for democracy!
*The Comprehensive Agriculture Reform Bill (nicknamed CARA) sees surprisingly little push-back from agribusinesses, despite its proposals to increase subsidies, perhaps anticipating benefits for their businesses.
*However the most shocking legislative news is the Presidential veto of the Air Defence Fighter Bill. A bill that had received substantial support from within the House and Senate, including from amongst the Socialist Party in the House, the President vetoed it, causing a serious shock to the aerospace industry, putting his position down in large part to the position of the Secretary of Defense’s statements in the Cabinet and later, the national media.
*Congresswoman Leanna Freeman, along with other Congressional Neo-Conservatives, hold a major press conference, defending their position on the Air Defence Fighter Bill - wherein they express their support for Secretary Cabrini. They go on to say that clearly Congressman Carpenter had not consulted with the DOD, and that plans for purchasing older fighters will not leave the air force obsolete. They stress their separation from the President’s “Socialist Defense Policy”, and continuing party unity. However, notable absentee at the press conference is retired Air Force General, Congressman Grant Mason.
*Despite this press conference, there is a degree of shock amongst Neo-Conservative voters, who feel somewhat put-out.
*Secretary of Defense Joseph Cabrini later holds a press conference, outlining the key plans he believes necessary to improve the Mountain States military, including expanded anti-aircraft and radar sites, upgrading the Navy to allow quicker responses to incidents, increased R&D funding, and an increase in standing troop numbers of 10,000, with a target date of 4 years - popular plans all, but, in the eyes of some, not enough.
*Debates on the budget continue to rage, with Neo-Conservative proposals adding to the clamour, with Senator Rice noting a “total failure of fiscal accountability” in the administration. This was added to by Congressman Norman Warner, who said: “It is unacceptable for the citizens of the MSA to vote in a government, only for that government to betray their trust by failing even to propose - let alone pass - a budget.” Moreover, writing in the Omaha World-Herald, Nebraska Senator Perryman slammed the administration for increasing the deficit without even addressing the budget. However, indications show that with the new Vice President finally confirmed, plans for a budget proposal are being expedited.
*Strikes by May Department Stores workers continue, and with stocks in May rapidly losing their value, the company begins rolls out their voluntary redundancy plans at all locations, and in selected areas, fires some workers. As soon as the firings are announced, the strikers intensify, with continued support from the WIU, embarrassing the company and scaring away customers, ironically driving the stock lower still.
*Senator Donovan and Congressman Robertson give a number of interviews promoting the cooperative model, announcing planned legislation they intend to co-sponsor to make it easier to establish one. Although most people remain too nervous to do so themselves, the two existing cooperatives in Texas continue to expand their business.
*A proposal advocating Texan divisionism is circulated by a prominent lobbyist organisation and think-tank, The Texas Pact, to the congressional offices of all Texans legislators, at both state and national level. It’s received mixedly, with some eager to support it, others concerned about Texan identity and cost.
*Senator Hanlon pioneers a new program - working with state governments, Native American reservations, the Mayo Clinic, and the Cuban government - to provide full scholarships to promising Native American students to study medicine abroad in Cuba (with the stipulation of working in their local communities afterwards), while Cuban students carry out their residencies at clinics associated with state universities and the Mayo Clinic, set up primarily to help impoverished Native American communities. Adopted mainly by Governor of New Mexico Alicia Lopez (P-H) and Governor of Texas Kris Brownback (P-H), the project proves popular. Indications show that Governor of Oklahoma, Robert Bailey (R-L) has also expressed interest.
*The Department of the Interior joins these efforts, drawing on funds from wherever they can in the budget to improve standards of living on the reservations. Their main successes involve coordinating with charities and NGOs to direct education efforts, donating books and equipment to schools and students. However infrastructure efforts are left primarily bear and unfinished in the few places they started, with Secretary Moskin blaming the lack of provision in the budget for specific Interior Department needs, especially in this area.
*After much planning, the Young Peoples Socialist League (YPSL) Congress takes place in the Henry A. Wallace Convention Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Delegates are bused in or brought in on cheap rail tickets for the lengthy event in the early summer. Focusing on the theme of “Unity”, the Congress features speeches from Congressional guests, including Senators Brewer and Donovan, Congresswoman Hernandez, and of course, Congressman Robertson. A message from the President is also read. The Congress decides on new rules and organisational structures whenever it meets, and although in reality much remains the same, key focuses highlighted in the media coverage include the idea of a new “United Front” on the left wing, an unbeatable coalition fighting back against right-wing extremism. Guests from the Labour Party of the Commonwealth, the Mexican Party of the Revolution, the Workers’ International Union, the American Indian Movement, and even the right wing of the Workers’ Revolutionary Party and the Communist Party of America are seen in attendance. Notable absentees include ANC guests, and the Progressive Hard Left congressmen who stood with the then-Vice President in Texas. Nevertheless, the Congress is deemed a roaring success by the party, and the YPSL representatives disappear back to their homes to spread the message of party unity.
*The Socialist Party formally announces what has been much rumoured - a World Socialist Forum, a meeting of Socialist politicians and thinkers from around the world, scheduled for Q4. No word yet on whether the President will be in attendance, but with political visits abroad from congressmen, promises of international delegations seem certain to materialise.

The Haitian Papers:

After lengthy media and political campaigning to highlight the dire situation in Haiti and the refugee camps in the MSA, the population was growing increasingly outraged. However, as sentiment was growing, a shocking headline from The Kansas City Star - “HAITIAN INTERVENTION: MILITARY PLANS LEAKED”. Unveiling leaked documents commissioned by the State Department, Defense Department, OSS, and the President himself, the Star broke the scandal of the year. Accusations and condemnations come flying, as news outlets and newspapers from across the country run with the story - highlighting past quotes that denied an invasion was being planned; throwing out quotations from the reports pressuring the Haitian government over mining interests; plans for OSS fabrication of evidence tying the leader of the Haitian Revolutionary Front to the Tonton Macoutes; and more.

The abuse and shock comes flying from the left wing and the right wing, the media firestorm over the Haitian invasion plans drafted by the government raging for months - and continuing to do so. The President’s most outspoken critic in Congress, Congressman Matthew Carpenter, said that the President was in danger of showing himself as "unprincipled, and undemocratic: in a word, this Socialist President is unsuited to the office."

The Wallace House Press Briefing Room has been a loud tumult in the light of these revelations - revelations the President has denied, both domestically and to allies abroad. Secretary of State Joseph Crocker - not known for his restraint, after his outburst in response to insults from President George Wallace of the USA - referred to The Kansas City Star as “irresponsible yellow journalism”, Peter Harding as “libelous fearmonger who strings together out of context statements and forgeries into so-called news”. Nevertheless, Mr Harding of the Star - a newspaper widely regarded as the Mountain States’ New York Times after the end of the war - has been paraded from political show to political show to talk about this leak. Moreover, Star Editor, Charles Aitken, has defended the paper’s position as providing the truth to the people, and defended under the First Amendment.

International News

*Hunger striker and de facto leader of the PSA black rights movement, Bobby Seale, collapses from hunger in his maximum security prison. Seized by the guards, he is taken to the infirmary. Two days later, the prisoner governor releases a press statement that Prisoner Seale has been restrained and sedated, with food being “consumed by his body”. Perhaps not altogether voluntarily.
*Nevertheless, somehow news of these hunger strikes makes it to the USA, with reports spreading to the population that prisoners in the USA have engaged in hunger strikes in solidarity with Bobby Seale and his fellows. Whether this was true or not, it soon becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, and US prisons become home to starving prisoners, some singing spirituals. In a handful of prisons, those singing were confined to solitary for months.
*In what is assumed to be retaliation for the sinking of three ships earlier in the year, an arson attack on a house in Atlanta, Georgia kills some 15 young black men and injures 23 more. No claims of responsibility have been made.
*Furthermore, a black man walking home from work with his teenage son in Alabama is accosted by a small crowd, before being publicly lynched. The perpetrators are not apprehended or, indeed, found at all.
*A secret FSLN raid of some 200 men behind the battle lines at a major government air field successfully destroys almost the entire Nicaraguan Air Force inventory of aircraft, including all its fighter planes. This successfully stalls government efforts to launch a counter attack based, as they have been on heavy air support from their aged airforce. However for the Somoza government, the attack proves somewhat of a blessing in disguise, as in late August they take delivery of new, more advanced airplanes sold by the Italian government - at some considerable cost, it might be said, despite the discounts.
*The first Coca Cola bottling plant opens in Mexico, as its market reforms continue to bring jobs and ice cold beverages to the people.
*Breaks from the past continue, with a 119-page document approved by the Party of the Mexican Revolution’s Central Committee outlining historical issues in Mexico’s history, laying many at the feet of both “Chief of the Revolution” the late Leon Trotsky, and the deceased President of old, Toledano himself. While praising them as great revolutionaries, it nevertheless identified them as “responsible for the most severe setback and heaviest losses suffered by the party, the state and the people”, amongst other issues. Controversial amongst the old guard, it is dealt with carefully.
*The militarisation of space continues as Japan conducts the first launch of a reusable re-entry vehicle. Commonly called a “space shuttle”, with this iteration named “Amaterasu-ōmikami”, it returns from orbit safely two days later, landing horizontally on a runway. Though its specifications and abilities are unknown, it is speculated to have the ability to conduct reconnaissance (of both the Earth and structures in space), and to capture satellites.
*A United States project attempting to build a tree farm/paper pulping plant in Brazil shuts down after nearly thirty years. Having built a large town based around its operation, the government takes over and develops it into a cellulose plant.
*Syrian warplanes continue their attacks in Iraq, launching bombing raids against towns in their ongoing attempt to realise their Pan-Syrian dream and seize northern Iraq.
*As the Co-Prosperity Sphere conducts a series of major naval exercises in the East China Sea, protests in the Chinese Leased Territories abate slightly over fears they may be a prelude to crushing the protestors.
*The League of Nations formally tables a floor discussion of the Mexican-Commwealth-MSA collaboration project. The Europa Pact comes out firmly against the project, whilst the Asian countries are lower to condemn, perhaps simply because the EP is pushing the agenda.
*Launching the largest submarine ever built for its first sea trials, the Kriegsmarine proudly announces it is reclaiming the seas from nature. The submarine is powered by a nuclear reactor, as well as being capable of carrying nuclear missiles.
*The Canadian Prime Minister rejects a plan that would allow provincial legislatures to reject or approve constitutional changes in a similar manner to amendments to the American Constitution. Small protests begin, in Francophone regions in particular.
*Protestors outside the Mountain States embassy in Sacramento increase to some 100 people, holding signs condemning “MSA Militarism” and “Economic Warfare”. A small group begins throwing rocks, bricks, and other detritus, which smashes the embassy windows. They are quickly apprehended by Pacific State kempeitai, but reports indicate no charges were brought.
*A handful of congressmen and senators from the Socialist Party travel abroad to Mexico and the Commonwealth, observing socialism in those countries. Many politicians in both countries pledge their interest in attending the WSF later this year.
*President Nelson Mandela announces he is writing a book. It’s working title being “Quotations from President Mandela”, so far it’s painted as a kind of ideological treatise meets revolutionary guide on waging war against an apartheid state.
*A United States Navy destroyer deploys into the Gulf of Mexico, steaming southeastwards towards the Bahamas.
*Fighting continues to rage in Haiti, with the Tonton Macoutes launching an abortive attack on Cap-Haitien, the second largest city. After meeting stiff resistance, they withdraw, but note well the anti-establishment violence roused inside the city at their attack.
Mountain States of America
Image

Motto: None
Map: http://i.imgur.com/XdRSari.png
Date: Q2 1981
Population: 46,379,782
Capital: Kansas City

Government:
Executive power vested in the Cabinet, headed by the President. The President is chosen by indirect elections every four years by the Electoral College, running with the Vice President on the same electoral “ticket”. The Cabinet is chosen and serves at the President’s pleasure, and is confirmed by the Senate.

Popularity: 23/100 (-10 Not My President, +20 Yes Our President, +5 sympathy, +15 effective government, -3 vetoed, -30 Haitian Papers)

President: Paul Roux-Johnson (S) - OYID
Vice President: Anthony C Nordquist (P-L) - Gesar

Secretary of State: Joseph Crocker (P-H)
Secretary of the Treasury: Robert Eskolm (P-C)
Secretary of Defense: Joseph Cabrini (R-N)
Attorney General: Bradley O'Hara (P-L)
Secretary of the Interior: Brendan Moskin (S)
Secretary of Agriculture: Amelia Delacruz (P-L)
Secretary of Commerce: Claire Edwards (P-M)
Secretary of Labor: Charles Hayes (P-L)
Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare: Mathias Oliver (P-M)
Secretary of Veterans Affairs: Jack H. Jacobs (P-H)

Next Presidential Election: Q4 1984


Legislative power vested in the Mountain States Congress, divided into the Senate (upper chamber) and the House of Representatives (lower chamber). The Senate is chosen by staggered elections every 2 years, divided into 3 classes which are chosen every 6 years. The House of Representatives are re-elected as a whole every 2 years.

Mountain States Senate

President pro tempore: Joanna Nelson (P-M)
Senate Majority Leader: Nathan Hanlon (P-H) - Snacks
Senate Majority Whip: XXX (P-C)
Senate Minority Leader: Franklin Weeks (R-M)
Senate Minority Whip: XXX

Progressives: 14
—Progressive Moderates: 5
—Progressive Liberals: 2
—Progressive Hard Left: 2
—Progressive Conservatives: 5

Republicans: 12
—Republican Moderates: 5
—Republican Conservatives: 3
—Republican Liberals: 3
—Republican Neo-Conservatives: 1

Socialists: 4
—Socialist: 3
—Socialist Workers: 1

Mountain States House of Representatives

Speaker of the House: Jeannette Johnson (P-M)
House Majority Leader: Geoffrey Wise (P-L) - Gesar
House Majority Whip: Cecelia Ortega (P-H)
House Minority Leader: Matthew J Carpenter (R-C) - Coinneach
House Minority Whip: Esteban Perez (R-C)

Progressives: 41
—Progressive Moderates: 10
—Progressive Liberals: 14
—Progressive Hard Left: 11
—Progressive Conservatives: 6

Republicans: 35
—Republican Moderates: 12
—Republican Conservatives: 13
—Republican Liberals: 4
—Republican Neo-Conservatives: 6

Socialists: 14
—Socialist: 10
—Socialist Workers: 4

Next House of Representatives Election: Q4 1982
Next Senate Class I Election: Q4 1986
Next Senate Class II Election: Q4 1982
Next Senate Class III Election: Q4 1984


Political Parties:

Progressive Party
—Progressive Moderates [Social Liberalism, Progressivism] - Jose Marquez - Flamelord
—Progressive Liberals [Progressivism, Trade Unionism] - Geoffrey Wise - Gesar
—Progressive Hard Left [Democratic Socialism, Leftist] - Nathan Hanlon - Snacks
—Progressive Conservatives [Neoliberalism, Social Conservatism, Centre-rightist] - Orval Scott - Rising Phoenix

Republican Party
—Republican Moderates [Social Moderates, Centre-rightist] - Vernon Baker - BgKnight
—Republican Conservatives [Social Conservatism, Rightist] - Matthew J Carpenter - Coinneach
—Republican Liberals [Social Liberalism, Centrist] - Christopher Miller - RinKou
—Republican Neo-Conservatives [Neoconservatism, Firm Anti-fascism] - Leanna J Freeman Zar

Socialist Party
—Socialist [Socialism, Leftist, Trade Unionism] - Philip Donovan - OYID
—Socialist Workers [Far Left, Pro-Mexico, Toledanist] - Paul C Sherwood

Minor Parties:
Workers’ Revolutionary Party [Toledanist, Trotskyist, Anti-Mexico]
Constitutionalist Party [Nationalism, Paleoconservatism, Rightist]
Communist Party USA [Communism, Marxism, Anti-fascism]
Greater United American Way Party [Pro-PSA, Pro-Japan, Militarism, Statism]
American People’s Unity Party [Pro-USA, Pro-German, National Socialism, White Supremacism]


States: 15

Montana
Population: 786,690

Senators:
Republican-M - Class II
Progressive-M - Class I
Representatives: 2
1 Republican - 1 Republican-N
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-M

Overview: Source of some of the largest copper deposits in the world, as well as gold, silver and coal mining. Lumber felling also a source of income.

Wyoming
Population: 469,557

Senators:
Republican-M - Class I
Republican-C - Class II
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-N

Overview: Produces coal, natural gas, oil and uranium, supplemented by agricultural efforts, including livestock, grains, and wool.

Colorado
Population: 2,889,964

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class I
Republican-N - Class III
Representatives: 6
3 Republican - 1 Republican-M, 1 Republican-C, 1 Republican-N
3 Progressive - 2 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-M

Overview: Contains substantial gold and silver mines, as well as natural gas and oil drilling. Machinery and industry also present in large concentrations. Cattle and dairy also common.

New Mexico
Population: 1,303,302

Senators:
Socialist - Class II
Socialist - Class I
Representatives: 3
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-H
1 Republican - 1 Republican-C
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Home to substantial Hispanic population, as a result of Latin American immigration from allied countries. Also holds some of the largest concentrations of Asians in the MSA, a combination of those who fled the war on the Pacific Coast, and more recent immigrants. Growing gang violence and organised crime in urban areas. Substantial copper and uranium mines, as well as oil and natural gas drilling. Agricultural produce includes chiles, pecans, potatoes, and livestock.

North Dakota
Population: 652,717

Senators:
Republican-M - Class III
Republican-L - Class I
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-M

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing cereals, buckwheat, corn, and oilseeds.

South Dakota
Population: 690,768

Senators:
Republican-M - Class II
Republican-C - Class III
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-C

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, corn, wheat, and soybeans. Also holds tourism draws, such as Mt. Rushmore.

Nebraska
Population: 1,569,825

Senators:
Republican-C - Class I
Republican-L - Class III
Representatives: 3
3 Republican - 1 Republican-M, 1 Republican-C, 1 Republican-N

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, corn, and soybeans.

Kansas
Population: 2,363,679

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class III
Republican-L - Class I
Representatives: 5
3 Progressive - 1 Progressive-M, 1 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-L
1 Republican - 1 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Shares the capital city with Missouri. Outside of the thriving urban centre, primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, wheat, soybeans, cotton, and more.

Oklahoma
Population: 3,025,290

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class II
Socialist - Class III
Representatives: 6
5 Republican - 3 Republican-M, 2 Republican-C
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-H

Overview: Hosts the largest concentration of Native Americans in the MSA, as well as a growing Hispanic population as new immigrants make their way north from the border states. Substantial aviation industry interests, as well as oil and natural gas. Largely secondary agricultural sector, including livestock, dairy and wheat.

Texas
Population: 14,229,191

Senators:
Progressive-H - Class I
Progressive-M - Class II
Representatives: 27
11 Progressive - 6 Progressive-H, 3 Progressive-M, 2 Progressive-L
9 Republican - 4 Republican-C, 2 Republican-M, 2 Republican-N, 1 Republican-L
7 Socialist - 5 Socialist, 2 Socialist-W

Overview: Most economically powerful state, producing substantial oil and natural gas. Also home to livestock farming, fisheries, and some crops including cereals and cotton. Has seen growing Hispanic population as immigration (legal and illegal) from allied Latin American countries increases.

Minnesota
Population: 4,075,970

Senators:
Progressive-L - Class I
Progressive-M - Class II
Representatives: 8
5 Progressive - 4 Progressive-L, 1 Progressive-M
2 Republican - 2 Republican-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Substantial agricultural producer, including sugar beets, sweetcorn, poultry, and lumber.

Iowa
Population: 2,913,808

Senators:
Progressive-L - Class II
Republican-M - Class III
Representatives: 6
3 Republican - 3 Republican-C
2 Progressive - 1 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Substantial agricultural producer, including livestock, dairy products, corn, and other crops.

Missouri
Population: 4,916,686

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class I
Progressive-C - Class III
Representatives: 9
6 Progressive - 3 Progressive-L, 2 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-M
2 Republican - 1 Republican-L, 1 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Shares the capital city with Kansas. Gateway transportation hub between the USA and MSA. Home to substantial aviation industry, as well as light manufacturing and lead and limestone mining.

Arkansas
Population: 2,286,435

Senators:
Progressive-H - Class II
Progressive-M - Class III
Representatives: 4
3 Progressive - 2 Progressive-H, 1 Progressive-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist-W

Overview: Strong Southern identity, yet also home to substantial black population. Notable for production of cotton, lumber, automobiles and bauxite.

Louisiana:
Population: 4,205,900

Senators:
Progressive-M - Class II
Socialist-W - Class III
Representatives: 8
5 Progressive - 2 Progressive-M, 2 Progressive-L, 1 Progressive-H
2 Republican - 2 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist-W

Overview: Substantial black population, primarily from post-war refugees and illegal immigrants from the USA. Remaining French influence from colonial era. Has substantial fishing, livestock and agriculture sectors, in addition to industrial sectors producing paper, petroleum and chemicals. Also notable for its film industry (the Hollywood of the South).


Economy:
Finance: Mountain Federal Reserve Bank based in Kansas City issues the Mountain States Dollar (MSD), derived from the old US dollar.

Services: 36.1% GDP, 26.7% labour force. Substantial spread over the sector; main contributors include real estate, aviation, tourism, and transport. 85% private, 10% joint-venture, 5% state-owned.
Industry: 43.9% GDP, 39.1% labour force. Primarily based in mining (copper, gold, silver, coal, sulphur, etc), and oil and gas drilling. Slightly lesser contribution from manufacturing. 70% private, 20% joint-venture, 10% state-owned.
Agriculture: 20.0% GDP, 29.2% labour force. Increasingly dominated by large companies and businesses. Improving mechanisation also leading to falling employment in this sector. 95% private, 5% joint-venture.
Unemployment: 5% (1.7% frictional, 3.3% structural)

Credit Rating: AA
Outlook: Stable

Government Budget
Treasury: 192 credits
Gold Reserves: [audited, >500]
Surplus: -15 (315 Revenue - 330 Expenditure)

Revenue: +315

Tax: +275 credits
Income Tax: +110
—Working Class - Somewhat Low: +48
—Middle Class - Somewhat Low: +36
—Upper Class - Moderate: +26

Social Insurance: +82 credits

Corporation Tax: +55 credits (545 Private Sector/10) [rounded up]

Trade Tariffs: +28
USA: +6 credits
PSA: +6 credits
Canada: +6 credits
Mexico: +10 credits


Public Corporations: +40
Post Service: -10 credit (+0 profit - 10 running cost)
State-owned industry: +30 credit (+50 profit - 20 running cost)
State-owned services: +20 credits (+40 profit, -20 running cost)
Mountain Federal Reserve Bank: +10 credit (+20 profit, - 10 running cost)
Public Housing: -10 credits (+20 profit, -30 running cost)

Expenditure: -330 credits
Defense: -20 credits
—Army: -10
—Navy & Marines: -5
—Air Force: -5
Social Protection: -49 credits
—Pensions: -11
—Income Support: -12
—Housing Subsidies: -8
—Family Allowances: -7
—Food Stamps: -5
—Orphans: -3
—Disability: -3
Health: -50 credits
—Health Insurance: -37
—Hospitals: -9
—Wages: -4
Education: -40 credits
—Public Schools: -23
—Private Subsidies: -6
—Colleges & Universities: -5
—Wages: -6
Public Order: -17 credits
—Police: -4
—Police Wages: -2
—Courts: -3
—Court Wages: -1
—Prisons: -4
—Prison Wages: -1
Infrastructure: -44 credits
—Road Maintenance: -9
—Railroad Subsidies: -10
—Airport Subsidies: -5
—Water Costs: -10
—Water Imports: -10
Industry: -9 credits
—Subsidies: -3
—Loans: -4
—Regulation: -2
Agriculture: -21 credits
—Subsidies: -15
—Loans: -5
—Education: -1
Energy: -50 credits
—Subsidies: -10
—PSA Imports: -17
—USA Imports: -14
—Canada Imports: -9
Government: -14 credits
—State: -5
—Local: -4
—Administrative: -2
—Intelligence: -1
—Wages: -2
Veterans: -9 credits
—Pensions: -4
—Education: -2
—Rehabilitation: -2
—Loans: -1
Science & Technology: -12 credits
—Defense: -5
—Health: -3
—General Science: -2
—Agriculture: -1
—Energy: -1
Culture: -5 credits
—Art: -1
—Music: -1
—Humanities: -1
—Literature: -1
—Other: -1
Debt Interest: 0 credits

Debt: 230 credits (60 owed to USA, 60 owed to PSA, 110 owed to domestic banks)
Interest rate: 20% per annum
Interest Payments: 0 credits per annum
Debt Ceiling: 400 credits

Private Sector: +545
Major Industries:
Power: +40 credits
Telecommunications: +50 credits
Transportation: +60 credits
Oil and Gas: +120 credits
Mining: +90 credits
Manufacturing: +60 credits
Agriculture: +100 credit

OTHER: +25 credits

Trade Unionism and Labor Rules

Trade Unions: 42.5% working population unionised.
Right to organise and collectively bargain protected by legislation. Child labour laws in place. Right to strike protected and largely unlimited; with no ballot required, no limits on supporting strikes, and no limits on flying pickets.

Congress of Industrial and Agricultural Organizations - Represents 20.7% working population. Progressive Party aligned, particularly the Liberal faction. Draws support from primarily from agriculture, with less representation in oil, mining, manufacturing, etc. Solid backing from service and public sector workers.
Workers’ International Union - Represents 21.8% working population. Socialist Party aligned, spread across the whole spectrum. Strong representation in industry, especially oil and natural gas, mining, and manufacturing of all sorts.

Minimum wage in place set by federal government, must be raised by Congress. States may set their own minimum wages in accordance with federal law.
Federal Minimum Wage: 70% Living Wage, 20% for tipped workers
Retirement Age: 66

Life:

Health: Fully subsidised universal healthcare, based around a compulsory social insurance plan. Hospital standards are high and provide comprehensive healthcare to most of the population, although waiting times and inefficiencies are high. Majority of hospitals privately owned and run. Health issues faced by the population primarily include obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and other non-infectious disease. Growing instances of drug abuse-related illness. Abortion rights fall under the right to privacy (Doe v. Wade), and is permitted until viability (except for health reasons). Average life expectancy: 76.
Housing: Urban population continues to grow due to mechanisation of substantial agricultural sector. Particularly in southern cities (NM, OK, AK, LA, TX), overcrowding is growing and standards of living are slipping, resulting in inner city poverty. Seriously falling standards of living continue to affect the Native American population.
Water: Clean, safe water provided to ~100% of population. Reservoirs throughout the country, primarily in the Missouri River watershed. Imports some fresh water from Canada to meet demands (20-45%, depending on needs).
Electricity: Net power importer. Exports oil, natural gas, and coal to the PSA and USA to meet their energy needs, while importing cheaper electricity in return due to treaty limitations on MSA power production capacity. MSA-based stations produce 30% energy needs, 30% from PSA plants, 25% from USA plants, 15% from Canadian plants. Processes Mexican oil and coal into energy and derivative products, which it sells back to Mexico (65% Mexican energy needs). Energy demands rising.
Education: 97.3% literacy. Universal primary education. 73% secondary enrolment rate, capacity to handle 90%. 21% university enrolment rate, capacity to handle 39%.
Transportation: Extensive transport links throughout the country. Air transportation services domestic and international passenger and cargo flights. Most common services to Mexico, the Caribbean, Australasia, the PSA and USA. Unofficial national carrier is Transcontinental & Western Air (TWA). Highways connect states all across the nation, with high private car ownership. Extensive privately owned rail services, primarily taking cargo throughout North America, with most private operators maintaining some passenger lines, despite declining profits.
Religion: 76% Christian (42% Protestant, 33% Catholic), 16% Unaffiliated, 8.4% Jewish, 0.6% Other
Ethnicities: 65.2% White, 19.1% Hispanic, 13.6% Black, 1.1% Asian (incl. 0.4% Japanese-Americans), 0.6% Native American, 0.4% Other
Crime: Crime is growing (5%), especially in urban areas. Rising fastest is violent crime (56% of reported crimes). Most common crimes are theft, robbery, and assault. Petty crime such as shoplifting and pickpocketing remains low. Prostitution remains illegal in all states so far. Drug related crimes are also on the rise (17%). Speculation is growing that organised crime from Latin America and Asia (via the PSA) is spreading in the MSA.
Enforcement: States operate their own police services. Federal level coast guard, army, navy, air force, and marine corps. Military limited by Treaty of Saint Paul to “a force incapable of waging offensive war against its neighbours and disturbing the balance of peace”. This has been interpreted as prohibiting ICBMs, nuclear weapons, aircraft carriers, amphibious craft, and strategic bombers - a view supported by neighbours. Often made/coerced to purchase US/German and PS/Japanese military equipment, often in outdated formats.
Navy: Largely refitted late-war ships, supplemented with some ships bought from Mexico. 60 ships - 1 battleship, 6 destroyers, 6 frigates, 5 corvettes, 8 fast attack craft, 10 mine countermeasure craft, 4 small submarines, 20 misc ships. Marines (7,500 active, 500 reserve) see limited use due to perceived limitations on amphibious warfare.
Air Force: Primarily supplied by McDonnell Aircraft, an almost entirely fighter-based force. No dedicated bombers, only fighter-bombers at best. Some 400 aircraft, 200 of which are combat aircraft. Remainder includes AEW, trainer, and transport.
Army: 170,000 active servicemen, 10,000 main reserve, 20,000 secondary reserve. Largely outdated small arms purchased from USA/PSA. Armored components better matched through indigenous development, though presently lagging 7 years behind neighbors.
Intelligence: Most intelligence work done by four main agencies - the Office of Strategic Services (under the Presidency), the Armed Forces Security Agency (under the Defence Department), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (under the Justice Department), and the Mountain States Secret Service (under the Treasury Department).

Huojin
General Secretary
General Secretary
Posts: 3354
Joined: 07:30:29 Thursday, 02 August, 2012

Re: News Bulletin

Post by Huojin » 18:51:13 Monday, 09 March, 2015

News

The Haitians Papers:

The scandal surround the Haitian Papers continues to deepen, as all sides begin defending their positions and firing attacks back at their detractors. Leaping on news of the scandal as a clear sign of hypocrisy and betrayal of American allies, Congressman Esteban Perez (R-TX) spoke on the issue, his comments being picked up by The Dallas Morning News. When the Justice Department announced that they had obtained an injunction against the further publication of the Haitian Papers by The Kansas City Star, Congressman Perez became recognised as one of the President’s most vocal detractors, and later that week introduced to the House a resolution calling for clarification and transparency from the government on the detailed of the alleged classified documents - co-sponsored by Congressman Carpenter (R-OK).

This resolution was met by support for the President and the administration - from Congressmen Wise (P-IA), Congresswoman Ortega (P-TX), Congressman Robertson (S-MN), and Congressman Lefebvre (P-LA). However Congressman Hughes (P-TX) - himself a former journalist - and others spoke out against the move, which was widely condemned in the national press as an act of censorship and in violation of the First Amendment. The Justice Department continued to press its position, with the Supreme Court taking up the case. While Socialist Party news sheet The Worker posited that the whole matter might be a psychological attack by fascists, few in the media took the claims seriously

The situation continued to deteriorate as “the most trusted man in America”, Walter Cronkite, reported critically on the what many have called a cover-up attempt. Quoting the Secretary of State, Joseph Crocker, Vice President Nordquist, and the President himself, Cronkite laid out the whole situation - from the case before the Supreme Court, to record-low poll numbers, to accusations levied at the “Right-wing” and reticence to comment from the Secretary of Defense. With poll numbers ever-declining, despite attempts to keep them from total collapse, voices in the public and political media begin questioning what is on the minds of many - is impeachment on the cards?

In a desperate effort to energise his base and generate political support, President Roux-Johnson begins what he calls the “Campaign to Defend Democracy” - a national speaking tour, aboard the New Red Special - evoking images of Socialist icon Eugene Deb’s own national tours. Gathering small crowds, primarily composed of core supporters and admirers amongst the Young People’s Socialist League and the Workers’ International Union, the President’s deeply left-wing speeches excites and mobilises many on the left of the Socialists - though often at the expense of those less radical elements of the Party. Nevertheless, the events are hugely promoted in WIU, YPSL, and Party media - who all agree to form a new group, the Independent Media Association. They’re joined by numerous small and locally owned media outlets friendly to the left-wing cause.

Travelling from predominantly African-American towns in Louisiana and Arkansas, Roux-Johnson spoke about black issues and anti-USA plans of the government. In Louisiana he astounded the media by publicly requesting that Secretary of Defense, Joseph Cabrini, resign from his office. Not to be outdone on his first stop, the President went on, in West Memphis, to controversially declassified OSS documents showing that previous governments had been involved in funding Ku Klux Klan activities in the USA - an act that would have significant repercussions.

Moving on to Missouri - both in rural areas and the city of St. Louis, the President continued to attack fascism, praising the partisans who had found against the invasion and declaring Socialist support for farmers and small business owners. The the slogan "Bu$ine$$ A$ U$ual" emblazoned on signs and banners throughout the city of St. Louis, the President spoke to both union workers and supporters from Iowa and Minnesota (the latter having been bussed in). While gathering support on the left of the political spectrum, including some of the politically disenfranchised and disengaged, the President nevertheless continues to meet steady opposition - with many left-wing politicians boycotting the rallies, and counter-demonstrations orchestrated by the Republican Party.

However what would come next would shake the political establishment - in short order, the Supreme Court would rule against the injunction against The Kansas City Star, declaring that the government’s case that the documents are false is too weak - and that by all indications, would appear to be untrue. If The Kansas City Star resuming publication of the Haitian Papers were not enough, The Denver Post unveils new and dramatic information - their own copy of the Haitian Papers, derived from “an anonymous source within the Roux-Johnson Administration”. What differentiates these papers from those published by the Star is one key factor - they bear the signature of the President himself. A second set of documents completely exonerates the State Department from having involvement, including Secretary of State Crocker. The media goes wild, and by the time President Roux-Johnson has arrived in Iowa after his train breaks down, forcing him to appear at the event on the back of a borrowed pick up truck, the crowds have greatly diminished, having instead gathered at protest demonstrations against the President. Nevertheless, his tour goes on, with the train being brought back into service and carrying the Campaign to Defend Democracy away from rural Iowa and towards Kansas. First stopping in impoverished areas of Topeka to denounce police brutality and the “far-right Stassen and Cargo administrations”, the President is met, not by welcoming crowds, but by protestors. The event itself remains unmarred, but with police sealing off the area and a far smaller crowd in attendance.

The President finally returns to the capital, to find that statements have been issued by Vice President Nordquist and Secretary of State Crocker, along with much of the Cabinet, announcing their resignation; the primarily reason cited being a mis-match between the President and both his Cabinet and the will of the American people. In response to these resignations, Senator Nathan Hanlon (P-TX) makes a statement that he believes the Coalition still lives, but that political faith in the President is such that he has abandoned the Coalition.

Roux-Johnson continues regardless, attacking police brutality and corporate oligarchy in Kansas City. Yet there are not the only attacks going on, as The Denver Post continues to publish new revelations, including documents that show Roux-Johnson has been circumventing and ignoring the Progressives in his Cabinet, in particular going over the head of the Secretary of Labor to provide preferential treatment to Socialist organizers and unions. In KC, the President’s crowd of followers has dwindled from the many thousands in Missouri to the hundreds again in KC. Instead, on the floors of the House and Senate, and more importantly, in front of television cameras - politicians now call openly for the impeachment of President Roux-Johnson. Led in both houses by tri-partisan groupings; Senators Meyer (P-MN), Holloway (R-NE), and Sherwood (S-LA); and Congressman Hughes (P-TX), Congressman Perez (R-TX), and Congresswoman Greer (S-KS); the President’s future seems deeply uncertain.

The situation grows worse, as in the City of Austin, normally a city firmly in the Progressive and Socialist camps, Congresswoman Freeman (R-TX) demands the impeachment of the President, calling the administration “Hitlerites”, and accusing them of suppressing free speech, making false accusations against innocent Americans, and planning for the “subjugation” of the Haitian people. The rally is received with large numbers, and although there is plenty of disagreement and discontent, the unpopularity of this President is wildly apparently. They match with open protests by the CIAO, in anger over the President’s actions giving preferential treatment to Socialists.

After building for some months, the Haitian Papers crisis appears to have hit its peak - resulting in the resignation of almost the entire Cabinet and most shockingly, demands echoing through KC for the impeachment of the President.

—————

*President Roux-Johnson announces the declassification of Operation Lee - a controversial OSS operation begun under President Wallace and continued under President Taylor that funded splinter elements of the White Supremacist organization the “Ku Klux Klan” inside the United States of America as a method of destabilizing the US government. These operations continued until the early 1960s, when they were halted as part of a disavowing of racist groups and a greater push for civil rights within the MSA. Following this announcement, Secretary of State Joseph Crocker, as one of the most senior African-Americans in government, came out firmly against the policy (which had been unknown to him at the time), and in support of the President’s actions in declassifying them.
*Other members of the Cabinet, including the Vice President, join in stating that they were unaware of Operation Lee prior to the President’s statements, but that they likewise condemn the policy.
*Events following this occurred rapidly - initially, there was silence on behalf of the United States, whilst nations including Canada, Germany, France, and Italy all condemned the actions of the MSA in having attempted to overthrow a neighboring state so brazenly. This silence was soon broken by the sound of explosions as two US fighter squadrons soar over the border and blow up two ammunitions dumps - one in Iowa and one in Arkansas. This is followed shortly thereafter by the firing of a ship-launched cruise missile from a US cruiser in the Gulf of Mexico, which struck a MSN naval depot in Louisiana. Total casualties from the attacks numbered 33.
*A statement was later issued by the US government, declaring that they have exercised “great restraint in the defense of [their] nation”, and that “for all the hundreds killed by spies and terrorists, justice has been served, and will continue to be served in the event of further Mountain State aggression”.
*President Roux-Johnson attempts to make good on his pledges of extensive use of Executive Orders to tackle poverty, lack of urban and rural development, and so on. He announces and publicly displays the orders at each of his stops along his Campaign to Defend Democracy. However bad news soon issues from the Supreme Court, who quickly sought to overturn these orders as conflicting with the limitations of Executive Orders to spend directly from the national treasury. In response, the President declares poverty to be a national emergency, and attempts to use the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to apply funds directly to the issue. However FEMA, as an independent federal agency, refuses to comply in light of both the President’s growing unpopularity and their legal advice that the definition of an emergency cannot be changed so lightly - a determination we are sure to see challenged either by the President or in Congress.
*At a speech by Senator Donovan (S-NM) at UNM, a number of student activists from Republican Liberal organisations stage a protest in the lecture theaters - shouting out and holding placards, criticizing the Senator’s credentials as a Democratic Trotskyist and a friend of Haiti, due to his deep involvement as a backer of the President. They are escorted out of the hall by campus security, and the rest of the speech goes smoothly, even being well received. However the situation is worse outside the lecture hall, where a small but vocal crowd of students - not just those inclined towards Republicanism - shout slogans and chants at the Senator as he leaves. They are shouted back at by left-wing supporters, despite being fewer in number. As the shouting match grows worse, local police join campus security to ensure the two sides remain separate.
*The welcome is regardless warmer than the one received by Congressman Arthur Robertson, who despite his reputation as a charmer appears at an event in Minnesota shortly after attending an event with the President in Iowa. By this time, the news of the President’s signature has broken, and the crowds gathered for this native Socialist son are far smaller than had been anticipated. Nevertheless, he issues pledges on behalf of the President that the tour will return to the North East later on.
*Secretary of Defense, Joseph Cabrini, resigns from office quietly and goes back to his home in Texas. The news is welcomed by many Coalition politicians and, surprisingly, by some Republican Conservatives.
*At several of his customary Thursday lunches, Vice President Nordquist is noted to meet some interesting parties, including members of the National Organization of Women, and both the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) and the National Education Association (NEA).
*Vice President Nordquist publicly releases a program to tackle Japanese-American issues, education, and inner city poverty - borrowing, in the view of some, from President Stone’s old policies. Nevertheless, the Vice President’s Project for America continues apace.
*Whispers abound that Mark Wade, Chairman of the Progressive National Committee and former Congressman for Kansas who lost his seat in 1980, might be stepping down from his position as PNC Chair. This is revealed on Labor Day to be the truth - with Vice President Nordquist filling the position. He makes a number of speeches at the Minnesota State Fair, pledging to continue the fight for the Project for America.
*The Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC) begins holding hearings in KC to hear testimony from Japanese-American and Asian-American witnesses and subjects of internment, with hundreds appearing to give their accounts to the Commission. Plans are also announced to travel around the country to hear testimonies sometime next year.
*Supporters of CWRIC and the Japanese-American Citizens League are greatly heartened with Congresswoman Miura (P-C) announces that she has begun work, with her fellow legislators, on a new bill to help former-internees. She is supported by Vice President Nordquist, who states: “It is time to recognize that even a great nation can make mistakes, and that those mistakes have serious consequences.”
*After an 11th hour veto by President Roux-Johnson, Congressman Carpenter (R-OK)’s Fighter Bill looked set to die on the floor of the Presidential Office. And, despite pledges from the Congressman to see the ADF Bill all the way through Congress yet again, his attempt at overcoming the veto was derailed, as the House called various Air Force generals - both currently serving and retired - to testify on the bill, and talks with the Secretary of Defense. The Fighter Bill soon became bogged down in the various political quagmires of Capitol Hill, and was voted down a number of congressmen abstaining from voting - too many to overcome. McDonnell and the aviation industry as a whole takes a serious hit with this news, with the future of the MSA’s aircraft looking uncertain.
*Yet out of this chaos, a new political force rises. Formerly of the Conservative Caucus of the Republican Party, Congressman Eugene Plawski (R-TX) breaks ranks, establishing (with former-Moderate Senator, Franklin Weeks (R-IA)) the Patriotic Defense Caucus. These “Patriots” are soon joined by rebellious Neo-Conservative Congressman, Grant Mason (R-NE), and pledge their support for America’s national defense and its defense industries - an increasingly popular view, as within the debate on the military, pacifists wane before mercantilists, and nationalists and normalists also grow in strength. How the Patriots Caucus will distinguish itself politically otherwise remains to be seen.
*Congressman Plawski soon makes his agenda for the present clear - meeting first in an informal setting with senior MSA military officials from the Army, Navy and most importantly, the Air Force.
*The Patriots Caucus also sets up a new fortnightly magazine/newspaper, titled “Don’t Tread On Me”. A number of military officers, academics, commentators and politicians take up the chance to contribute, offering both views both consistent and in conflict with Patriot views, with the aims of provoking discussion in matters of the military, science, economics, and politics. An odd new publication, it gains an initial burst of popularity, though it remains to be seen how soon they will bottom out into regular patterns.
*Senator Vernon Baker (R-WY) makes a number of appearances on radio shows across the country, particularly in the south, talking about the plight of African-Americans in the country and pledging to do more to help the community - along with promises his office is drafting legislation to that effect. Other Republican Moderates, including Congresswoman Olivia Pina (R-OK), also get out amongst the people, spreading the Republican message. It’s early days yet, but with the political situation uncertain this may be a sign of shoring up of support ahead of the midterms - whatever it is, it seems to be working.
*A number of Republican members of Congress hold various fundraisers and dinners amongst supporters - all of whom seem eager to get onboard while the opposition is floundering.
*Joining the political movement, Senator Jose Marquez (P-TX) announces the Progressive Moderates are founding their own PAC - Americans for Progress. Building on a traditional support base and handily gathering support form critics of the President and the left (who the Moderates have remained apart from), the efforts appear to be gaining traction.
*The Democracy for America PAC continues its hunt for grassroots and community candidates, spurred on by a lack of trust in the establishment that is flowing from the Haitian Papers scandal.
*Interest in divisionism continues to pick up in Texas, gaining particular traction in the jokingly named “El Norte” proposed state. Some state legislature members state that of course, such a name would be foolish, and suggest “Rio Grande” or something to that effect instead. The whole matter prompts a debate in the Texas House of Representatives about the matter, with which the also not-seriously-named “Plainsland” representatives join in enthusiastically. A number of local newspapers pick up the matter, with a minor buzz developing.
*Elsewhere in Texas, news isn’t quite so positive. With the Houston Riots having left a blackened scar of charred buildings and burnt-out cars in the heart of the city, the clean up operations begin in earnest. With minimal national interest, former Congressman (R-TX) and re-elected Mayor of Houston Peter Santos rallies community efforts to clean up the city. He’s eventually joined by Senator Jose Marquez (P-TX), who sets himself up as the only major national politician to visit the damaged community. Volunteering with the clean-up for several days, the Senator comments about the necessity of police respect and cooperation with the community - upsetting police slightly but clearly gaining popular support.
*Despite a great deal of renewed community unity, some tensions arise when police are unable to convince “Neighborhood Self-Defense Corps”, primarily composed of supporters of the Socialist Workers’ Caucus. While not actively resisting the police and maintaining their rights to bear arms under the Second Amendment, disagreement remains - with the police arguing in favor of community unity and cooperation, and the neighborhood groups arguing that they’re defending against risks of further rioting.
*Profits margins for railways continue to decline as relations with neighbors both fascist and communist continue to decline. In a desperate attempt to refocus efforts, a number of them, including Burlington Northern, Kansas City Southern, and Union Pacific have announced cutbacks to their passenger lines, with fewer trains running, especially in rural areas. Some people in less-well-connected parts of the country have voiced fears about being cut off from the rest of the country.
*Senator Zachary Goldman (R-KS) appears as a guest lecturer at his alma mater, the University of Kansas. Discussing the future of energy technology, the Senator highlights nuclear, solar, thermal, and more as key areas to explore for the youth of today. The talk is well received, if slightly overshadowed by events elsewhere in the state. It also prompts excitement in the burgeoning alternative energy community, just as much as it fuels concerns amongst the oil lobby.
*Activity picks up on the Volunteer Corps bill, but only slightly - and with the bill being a favorite of Senator Donovan, whose political capital is running a little low, and then-Vice President, now-President Roux-Johnson, it’s future seems set to be tied up in present scandals.
*Senator Zachary Goldman (R-KS) takes to the political scene with his most recent contribution, a bill to save the American buffalo. Taking on a new environmentalist swing, Senator Goldman has latched onto an issue with cross-party appeal - bringing both conservationist and economic benefits. Some have speculated that it’s a bill the Progressives can hardly vote against, given their Party’s symbol.
*After meeting with refugee leaders and exiles from the 1960s amongst the Haitian community in Louisiana, Congressman Christopher Miller (R-TX) joins a bipartisan fact-finding mission to Port au Prince itself, alongside Senator Nathan Hanlon (P-TX). At a joint press conference, Senator Hanlon said: “No matter what conflict or controversy might be troubling our relationship, the Haitian people are friends of the MSA. It is only right to act as such, and so we have sought to make ourselves as informed as possible of the present situation and hear from the leaders and people of Haiti what we can do to help as friends and allies.”
*Conditions in the Haitian refugee camps remain generally poor, with an unusually high number of orphans, and disease continuing to spread due to cramped conditions, despite the intervention of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. The Interior Department continues to fight to combat the issues, as well as containing the refugees from spreading out as best they can. They release their own audit for the population of the camps, being at some 15,592 by their count, though likely higher as some may have avoided being counted, and others may have evaded the camps altogether.
*Governor Bob Meier of Minnesota names Morgan Lewis to the now-vacant seat in the House of Representatives that formerly belonged to Vice President Nordquist.
*Arthur Paley, assassin of President Charles Stone, is found not guilty by reason of insanity in a controversial trial that has stirred up national debate over restricting the insanity defense. However events there have been somewhat overshadowed by the subsequent killing of Mr. Paley by James Riddle - a former felon with ties to organised crime. Subsequent to his arrest, Mr. Riddle was charged with murder, and now awaits trial. Questions have been raised over the influence organised crime still has in this country.
*With the shooting of the President and Mr Paley, several Progressive Hard Left politicians, led by Senator Hanlon (P-TX), come out to criticize Neo-Conservative keenness to loosen gun laws with legislation they presented before the Senate - a view shared by plenty of Americans. Their standing slips a little further, adding to the pushback to their opposition of the Fighter Bill. However in drawing on their old left-wing roots, the Neo-Cons remain largely popular for their leading efforts to shun the President.
*Opposition to the gun bill seems to have come primarily from a number of southern and eastern states, including Minnesota, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, and of course, Kansas itself. However in states with a high proportion of gun owners, including Wyoming, Montana, the Dakotas, and Arkansas, popular support seems to be behind the bill, despite the assassination of the President.
*The Center for Disease Control continues to report on the minor spread of peculiar illnesses, but in the few news articles it’s mentioned in it’s referred to as a “gay-related immune disease” - with scientists noting that heterosexuals have been totally fine.
*Congressman Matthew Carpenter (R-OK) meets with business leaders in New Mexico and Texas, before travelling over the border into newly reforming Mexico to meet burgeoning business leaders there. The meetings go well, and from them emerges a number of new businesses backing the Congressman’s proposed export tax break as detailed in the Republican budget proposal. How this will play out remains unclear though, as the country passes a record 9 months without a new budget from the administration. Questions begin to speculate as to how long this budgetary crisis will linger on, and whether it will be resolved before a government shutdown occurs as the federal government’s spending is not renewed.
*Congresswoman Ortega (P-TX) and Congressman Murphy (S-TX) go on a joint goodwill visit to Mexico in the aftermath of the initial breaking of the Haitian Papers, in an attempt to smooth over relations. They also meet with some of the scientists and government officials involved in the project with CNEE, although are, of course, kept in the dark as to its actual activities. The visit is well received, but shortly after returning to MSA, renewed news of the scandal breaks and returns the situation to a less-than-ideal position.
*With no new testimony made before HUAC by anyone involved in the investigation into Standard Oil of California, their share price stabilises slightly, though the markets remain pessimistic about the company’s future after the Committee releases its support., with many expecting contempt of Congress charges to be brought.
*After pushing quietly for a number of years, Congressman Ron King (P-MO) secures some support within his party to call for a new Pan-American Energy Summit, with names such as Senator Kennedy (P-IA), Congressman Ellis (P-LA), and Congresswoman Carroll (P-MN), among others, backing his call. However such a summit doesn’t seem likely to materialise with relations on the rocks with the USA and the President potentially facing impeachment.
*Campaigning ramps up in Louisiana as Mary Killian prepares to defend her position as Governor of the state.
*The American Unity Initiative quietly holds their American Unity Congress, an event that is almost entirely overshadowed by events between the MSA and USA, not to mention the crisis involving the President.
*The AUI’s attempts to smuggle a new shipment of The Grasshopper Lies Heavy into Canada and, from there, also into the USA are quashed when they are impounded at the border and the books burned. The three MS Americans accompanying the books are also charged by the Canadian Border Services with smuggling of illicit materials, illegal materials, and a string of other charges. They’re held in custody.
*The Board of Executives of May Department Stores convenes to bring about the firing of their CEO. A new CEO is appointed, and tasked with shaking things up. He begins by increasing the scope of voluntary redundancies across the company, transferring some employees and closing approximately a tenth of locations, selling most of them to whoever will buy them. Job losses abound, but the company’s shares begin to stabilise.
*The Beautiful America Committee is established, a political action committee focused primarily on environmental issues, ranging from animal conservation to alternative energy to sustainable development. It draws cross-spectrum support, despite it’s main beneficiaries being Republican Liberals.

International News

*Hunger strikes in prisons continue in the United States, coupled with growing street protests in cities in the South. However as most prisoners are left to die and other begin to lose their nerve, the hunger strike all but ends with September. Police suppression of the protests soon brings those down as well, though the singing of spirituals in Black churches seems to be louder than before.
*Black Liberation Army and community leaders issue a condemnation in their own news sheets of the MSA for their funding of the KKK. They state that, in the past or not, it’s a fundamentally immoral action to have engaged in, and one that betrays the entire fight for equality and liberation. Several leaders disavow their ties to the MSA, though most in the upper echelons of the leadership remain reluctant to do so just yet.
*Racial violence continues regardless, with the Governor of Alabama being shot and wounded, but (“regrettably” according to a BLA source) not killed. A commemorative bust of George Wallace is also defaced in Birmingham, Alabama.
*Elsewhere, some elderly and former KKK members are arrested by the US government - including two former leading individuals who had quit and become advocates for racial equality. All of those arrested are tried and found guilty of espionage and terrorism for ties to the MSA, and executed - some 50+ people in all.
*Shortly after a visit by MSA Congressional representatives Ortega and Murphy, CNEE temporarily refuses access to MSA scientists over leak fears, asking them to remain at the homes provided for them.
*The League of Nations tables a resolution to be considered later this year concerning a condemnation of Mexico, the Commonwealth, and the MSA for the secretive project operated by CNEE.
*Congressman Plawski (R-TX) pays a discrete visit to both Mexico and the Commonwealth, meeting with fellow legislators.
*German submarines engage in war games and exercises in the Atlantic, where they are joined by US submarines and destroyers. The Kriegsmarine announces that their new submarines are the most advanced yet, and proved a decisive factor in their war games.
*In response, Japanese and Pacific States troops engage in their own displays, of a far more regimented nature. A huge military parade is featured in San Francisco at the height of summer, with three IJN aircraft carriers and various battleships being joined by the PSN sailing through San Francisco Bay under the Golden Gate Bridge. On land, troops and armored vehicles and tanks roll through the streets, and overhead, squadrons of fighters roar through the sky - an altogether impressive assemblage.
*Throughout all of this, the Mountain States ambassador remains holed up in the embassy - though he swears the jets are making a loop near Sacramento.
*In Cuba, Secretary of State Crocker makes a visit, conducting diplomatic meetings and visiting students there for the medical exchange program. The meeting goes well, although relations sour between the MSA and Cuba slightly more as the extent of the scandal is revealed.
*Across the northern border, some Canadian provinces, particularly those French speaking regions, agitate for greater regional autonomy. Some minor protests result, which turn into rallies as state-level politicians jump on board. The Canadian federal government remains resolutely against the idea.
*An destroyer belonging to the US Navy anchors off the coast of Haiti, but within international waters. This does little to calm the Haitian government, who promptly descend into an outright panic, calling for aid and help from various allies. Cuba in particular obliges, though the fighting in Haiti goes none the better for it - with Tonton Macoutes growing in boldness, and launching another major assault against Cap-Haitien. Fighting now rages on the streets of the city, with the government forces back-pedalling to preserve their fighting capability.
*Interest in President Mandela’s book grows in neighboring countries, leading it to be banned prior to publication in Malawi, Madagascar, Mozambique, Mauritius, Rhodesia, Katanga, and the Seychelles - all in all, not bad for a book preaching revolution.
*Mexico introduces its new policy, rolling back all state control over the regulation of farmer surplus, which is now free to be sold on the common market. They also establish Town Village Enterprises - public enterprises under the oversight of local government bodies.
*Fighting in Nicaragua continues, with the new Italian fighters making a serious dent in FSLN attempts to advance. They resume fighting under the cover of jungles, closing in around the capital and isolate it from the rest of the country, but find themselves unable to make major inroads where the Somoza government’s air umbrella provides shelter for their increasingly beleaguered ground forces.

Mountain States of America
Image

Motto: None
Map: http://i.imgur.com/XdRSari.png
Date: Q3 1981
Population: 46,379,782
Capital: Kansas City

Government:
Executive power vested in the Cabinet, headed by the President. The President is chosen by indirect elections every four years by the Electoral College, running with the Vice President on the same electoral “ticket”. The Cabinet is chosen and serves at the President’s pleasure, and is confirmed by the Senate.

Popularity: 8/100 (+6 CDD Tour, +6 political support, -21 scandal deepens, -6 calls for impeachment)

President: Paul Roux-Johnson (S) - OYID
Vice President: [vacant]

Secretary of State: [vacant]
Secretary of the Treasury: Robert Eskolm (P-C)
Secretary of Defense: [vacant]
Attorney General: [vacant]
Secretary of the Interior: Brendan Moskin (S)
Secretary of Agriculture: [vacant]
Secretary of Commerce: Claire Edwards (P-M)
Secretary of Labor: [vacant]
Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare: Mathias Oliver (P-M)
Secretary of Veterans Affairs: [vacant]

Next Presidential Election: Q4 1984


Legislative power vested in the Mountain States Congress, divided into the Senate (upper chamber) and the House of Representatives (lower chamber). The Senate is chosen by staggered elections every 2 years, divided into 3 classes which are chosen every 6 years. The House of Representatives are re-elected as a whole every 2 years.

Mountain States Senate

President pro tempore: Joanna Nelson (P-M)
Senate Majority Leader: Nathan Hanlon (P-H) - Snacks
Senate Majority Whip: Orval Scott - Rising Phoenix
Senate Minority Leader: Franklin Weeks (R-D)
Senate Minority Whip: Vernon Baker - BgKnight

Progressives: 14
—Progressive Moderates: 5
—Progressive Liberals: 2
—Progressive Hard Left: 2
—Progressive Conservatives: 5

Republicans: 12
—Republican Moderates: 4
—Republican Conservatives: 3
—Republican Liberals: 3
—Republican Neo-Conservatives: 1
—Republican Patriotic Defense: 1

Socialists: 4
—Socialist: 3
—Socialist Workers: 1

Mountain States House of Representatives

Speaker of the House: Jeannette Johnson (P-M)
House Majority Leader: Geoffrey Wise (P-L) - Gesar
House Majority Whip: Cecelia Ortega (P-H)
House Minority Leader: Matthew J Carpenter (R-C) - Coinneach
House Minority Whip: Esteban Perez (R-C)

Progressives: 41
—Progressive Moderates: 10
—Progressive Liberals: 14
—Progressive Hard Left: 11
—Progressive Conservatives: 6

Republicans: 35
—Republican Moderates: 12
—Republican Conservatives: 12
—Republican Liberals: 4
—Republican Neo-Conservatives: 5
—Republican Patriotic Defense: 2

Socialists: 14
—Socialist: 10
—Socialist Workers: 4

Next House of Representatives Election: Q4 1982
Next Senate Class I Election: Q4 1986
Next Senate Class II Election: Q4 1982
Next Senate Class III Election: Q4 1984


Political Parties:

Progressive Party (PNC Chair: Anthony C Nordquist - Gesar)
—Progressive Moderates [Social Liberalism, Progressivism] - Jose Marquez - Flamelord
—Progressive Liberals [Progressivism, Trade Unionism] - Geoffrey Wise - Gesar
—Progressive Hard Left [Democratic Socialism, Leftist] - Nathan Hanlon - Snacks
—Progressive Conservatives [Neoliberalism, Social Conservatism, Centre-rightist] - Orval Scott - Rising Phoenix

Republican Party
—Republican Moderates [Social Moderates, Centre-rightist] - Vernon Baker - BgKnight
—Republican Conservatives [Social Conservatism, Rightist] - Matthew J Carpenter - Coinneach
—Republican Liberals [Social Liberalism, Centrist] - Zachary Goldman - Smyg
—Republican Neo-Conservatives [Neoconservatism, Firm Anti-fascism] - Leanna J Freeman - Zar
—Republican Patriotic Defense [Pro-Military, Pro-National Defense, Populism] - Eugene Plawski - Serenissima

Socialist Party
—Socialist [Socialism, Leftist, Trade Unionism] - Philip Donovan - OYID
—Socialist Workers [Far Left, Pro-Mexico, Toledanist] - Paul C Sherwood

Minor Parties:
Workers’ Revolutionary Party [Toledanist, Trotskyist, Anti-Mexico]
Constitutionalist Party [Nationalism, Paleoconservatism, Rightist]
Communist Party USA [Communism, Marxism, Anti-fascism]
Greater United American Way Party [Pro-PSA, Pro-Japan, Militarism, Statism]
American People’s Unity Party [Pro-USA, Pro-German, National Socialism, White Supremacism]


States: 15

Montana
Population: 786,690

Senators:
Republican-M - Class II
Progressive-M - Class I
Representatives: 2
1 Republican - 1 Republican-N
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-M

Overview: Source of some of the largest copper deposits in the world, as well as gold, silver and coal mining. Lumber felling also a source of income.

Wyoming
Population: 469,557

Senators:
Republican-M - Class I
Republican-C - Class II
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-N

Overview: Produces coal, natural gas, oil and uranium, supplemented by agricultural efforts, including livestock, grains, and wool.

Colorado
Population: 2,889,964

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class I
Republican-N - Class III
Representatives: 6
3 Republican - 1 Republican-M, 1 Republican-C, 1 Republican-N
3 Progressive - 2 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-M

Overview: Contains substantial gold and silver mines, as well as natural gas and oil drilling. Machinery and industry also present in large concentrations. Cattle and dairy also common.

New Mexico
Population: 1,303,302

Senators:
Socialist - Class II
Socialist - Class I
Representatives: 3
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-H
1 Republican - 1 Republican-C
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Home to substantial Hispanic population, as a result of Latin American immigration from allied countries. Also holds some of the largest concentrations of Asians in the MSA, a combination of those who fled the war on the Pacific Coast, and more recent immigrants. Growing gang violence and organised crime in urban areas. Substantial copper and uranium mines, as well as oil and natural gas drilling. Agricultural produce includes chiles, pecans, potatoes, and livestock.

North Dakota
Population: 652,717

Senators:
Republican-M - Class III
Republican-L - Class I
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-M

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing cereals, buckwheat, corn, and oilseeds.

South Dakota
Population: 690,768

Senators:
Republican-M - Class II
Republican-C - Class III
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-C

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, corn, wheat, and soybeans. Also holds tourism draws, such as Mt. Rushmore.

Nebraska
Population: 1,569,825

Senators:
Republican-C - Class I
Republican-L - Class III
Representatives: 3
3 Republican - 1 Republican-M, 1 Republican-C, 1 Republican-D

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, corn, and soybeans.

Kansas
Population: 2,363,679

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class III
Republican-L - Class I
Representatives: 5
3 Progressive - 1 Progressive-M, 1 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-L
1 Republican - 1 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Shares the capital city with Missouri. Outside of the thriving urban centre, primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, wheat, soybeans, cotton, and more.

Oklahoma
Population: 3,025,290

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class II
Socialist - Class III
Representatives: 6
5 Republican - 3 Republican-M, 2 Republican-C
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-H

Overview: Hosts the largest concentration of Native Americans in the MSA, as well as a growing Hispanic population as new immigrants make their way north from the border states. Substantial aviation industry interests, as well as oil and natural gas. Largely secondary agricultural sector, including livestock, dairy and wheat.

Texas
Population: 14,229,191

Senators:
Progressive-H - Class I
Progressive-M - Class II
Representatives: 27
11 Progressive - 6 Progressive-H, 3 Progressive-M, 2 Progressive-L
9 Republican - 3 Republican-C, 2 Republican-M, 2 Republican-N, 1 Republican-L, 1 Republican-D
7 Socialist - 5 Socialist, 2 Socialist-W

Overview: Most economically powerful state, producing substantial oil and natural gas. Also home to livestock farming, fisheries, and some crops including cereals and cotton. Has seen growing Hispanic population as immigration (legal and illegal) from allied Latin American countries increases.

Minnesota
Population: 4,075,970

Senators:
Progressive-L - Class I
Progressive-M - Class II
Representatives: 8
5 Progressive - 4 Progressive-L, 1 Progressive-M
2 Republican - 2 Republican-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Substantial agricultural producer, including sugar beets, sweetcorn, poultry, and lumber.

Iowa
Population: 2,913,808

Senators:
Progressive-L - Class II
Republican-D - Class III
Representatives: 6
3 Republican - 3 Republican-C
2 Progressive - 1 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Substantial agricultural producer, including livestock, dairy products, corn, and other crops.

Missouri
Population: 4,916,686

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class I
Progressive-C - Class III
Representatives: 9
6 Progressive - 3 Progressive-L, 2 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-M
2 Republican - 1 Republican-L, 1 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Shares the capital city with Kansas. Gateway transportation hub between the USA and MSA. Home to substantial aviation industry, as well as light manufacturing and lead and limestone mining.

Arkansas
Population: 2,286,435

Senators:
Progressive-H - Class II
Progressive-M - Class III
Representatives: 4
3 Progressive - 2 Progressive-H, 1 Progressive-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist-W

Overview: Strong Southern identity, yet also home to substantial black population. Notable for production of cotton, lumber, automobiles and bauxite.

Louisiana:
Population: 4,205,900

Senators:
Progressive-M - Class II
Socialist-W - Class III
Representatives: 8
5 Progressive - 2 Progressive-M, 2 Progressive-L, 1 Progressive-H
2 Republican - 2 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist-W

Overview: Substantial black population, primarily from post-war refugees and illegal immigrants from the USA. Remaining French influence from colonial era. Has substantial fishing, livestock and agriculture sectors, in addition to industrial sectors producing paper, petroleum and chemicals. Also notable for its film industry (the Hollywood of the South).


Economy:
Finance: Mountain Federal Reserve Bank based in Kansas City issues the Mountain States Dollar (MSD), derived from the old US dollar.

Services: 36.1% GDP, 26.7% labour force. Substantial spread over the sector; main contributors include real estate, aviation, tourism, and transport. 85% private, 10% joint-venture, 5% state-owned.
Industry: 43.9% GDP, 39.1% labour force. Primarily based in mining (copper, gold, silver, coal, sulphur, etc), and oil and gas drilling. Slightly lesser contribution from manufacturing. 70% private, 20% joint-venture, 10% state-owned.
Agriculture: 20.0% GDP, 29.2% labour force. Increasingly dominated by large companies and businesses. Improving mechanisation also leading to falling employment in this sector. 95% private, 5% joint-venture.
Unemployment: 5% (1.7% frictional, 3.3% structural)

Credit Rating: AA
Outlook: Stable

Government Budget
Treasury: 192 credits
Gold Reserves: [audited, >500]
Surplus: -26 (314 Revenue - 340 Expenditure)

Revenue: +315

Tax: +274 credits
Income Tax: +110
—Working Class - Somewhat Low: +48
—Middle Class - Somewhat Low: +36
—Upper Class - Moderate: +26

Social Insurance: +82 credits

Corporation Tax: +54 credits (540 Private Sector/10) [rounded up]

Trade Tariffs: +28
USA: +6 credits
PSA: +6 credits
Canada: +6 credits
Mexico: +10 credits


Public Corporations: +40
Post Service: -10 credit (+0 profit - 10 running cost)
State-owned industry: +30 credit (+50 profit - 20 running cost)
State-owned services: +20 credits (+40 profit, -20 running cost)
Mountain Federal Reserve Bank: +10 credit (+20 profit, - 10 running cost)
Public Housing: -10 credits (+20 profit, -30 running cost)

Expenditure: -340 credits
Defense: -20 credits
—Army: -10
—Navy & Marines: -5
—Air Force: -5
Social Protection: -49 credits
—Pensions: -11
—Income Support: -12
—Housing Subsidies: -8
—Family Allowances: -7
—Food Stamps: -5
—Orphans: -3
—Disability: -3
Health: -50 credits
—Health Insurance: -37
—Hospitals: -9
—Wages: -4
Education: -40 credits
—Public Schools: -23
—Private Subsidies: -6
—Colleges & Universities: -5
—Wages: -6
Public Order: -17 credits
—Police: -4
—Police Wages: -2
—Courts: -3
—Court Wages: -2
—Prisons: -5
—Prison Wages: -1
Infrastructure: -44 credits
—Road Maintenance: -9
—Railroad Subsidies: -10
—Airport Subsidies: -5
—Water Costs: -10
—Water Imports: -10
Industry: -9 credits
—Subsidies: -3
—Loans: -4
—Regulation: -2
Agriculture: -21 credits
—Subsidies: -15
—Loans: -5
—Education: -1
Energy: -50 credits
—Subsidies: -10
—PSA Imports: -17
—USA Imports: -14
—Canada Imports: -9
Government: -14 credits
—State: -5
—Local: -4
—Administrative: -2
—Intelligence: -1
—Wages: -2
Veterans: -9 credits
—Pensions: -4
—Education: -2
—Rehabilitation: -2
—Loans: -1
Science & Technology: -12 credits
—Defense: -5
—Health: -3
—General Science: -2
—Agriculture: -1
—Energy: -1
Culture: -5 credits
—Art: -1
—Music: -1
—Humanities: -1
—Literature: -1
—Other: -1
Debt Interest: 0 credits

Debt: 276 credits (75 owed to USA, 75 owed to PSA, 126 owed to domestic banks)
Interest rate: 20% per annum
Interest Payments: 0 credits per annum
Debt Ceiling: 400 credits

Private Sector: +540
Major Industries:
Power: +40 credits
Telecommunications: +50 credits
Transportation: +58 credits
Oil and Gas: +119 credits
Mining: +90 credits
Manufacturing: +58 credits
Agriculture: +100 credit

OTHER: +25 credits

Trade Unionism and Labor Rules

Trade Unions: 42.5% working population unionised.
Right to organise and collectively bargain protected by legislation. Child labour laws in place. Right to strike protected and largely unlimited; with no ballot required, no limits on supporting strikes, and no limits on flying pickets.

Congress of Industrial and Agricultural Organizations - Represents 20.7% working population. Progressive Party aligned, particularly the Liberal faction. Draws support from primarily from agriculture, with less representation in oil, mining, manufacturing, etc. Solid backing from service and public sector workers.
Workers’ International Union - Represents 21.8% working population. Socialist Party aligned, spread across the whole spectrum. Strong representation in industry, especially oil and natural gas, mining, and manufacturing of all sorts.

Minimum wage in place set by federal government, must be raised by Congress. States may set their own minimum wages in accordance with federal law.
Federal Minimum Wage: 70% Living Wage, 20% for tipped workers
Retirement Age: 66

Life:

Health: Fully subsidised universal healthcare, based around a compulsory social insurance plan. Hospital standards are high and provide comprehensive healthcare to most of the population, although waiting times and inefficiencies are high. Majority of hospitals privately owned and run. Health issues faced by the population primarily include obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and other non-infectious disease. Growing instances of drug abuse-related illness. Abortion rights fall under the right to privacy (Doe v. Wade), and is permitted until viability (except for health reasons). Average life expectancy: 76.
Housing: Urban population continues to grow due to mechanisation of substantial agricultural sector. Particularly in southern cities (NM, OK, AK, LA, TX), overcrowding is growing and standards of living are slipping, resulting in inner city poverty. Seriously falling standards of living continue to affect the Native American population.
Water: Clean, safe water provided to ~100% of population. Reservoirs throughout the country, primarily in the Missouri River watershed. Imports some fresh water from Canada to meet demands (20-45%, depending on needs).
Electricity: Net power importer. Exports oil, natural gas, and coal to the PSA and USA to meet their energy needs, while importing cheaper electricity in return due to treaty limitations on MSA power production capacity. MSA-based stations produce 30% energy needs, 30% from PSA plants, 25% from USA plants, 15% from Canadian plants. Processes Mexican oil and coal into energy and derivative products, which it sells back to Mexico (65% Mexican energy needs). Energy demands rising.
Education: 97.3% literacy. Universal primary education. 73% secondary enrolment rate, capacity to handle 90%. 21% university enrolment rate, capacity to handle 39%.
Transportation: Extensive transport links throughout the country. Air transportation services domestic and international passenger and cargo flights. Most common services to Mexico, the Caribbean, Australasia, the PSA and USA. Unofficial national carrier is Transcontinental & Western Air (TWA). Highways connect states all across the nation, with high private car ownership. Extensive privately owned rail services, primarily taking cargo throughout North America, with most private operators maintaining some passenger lines, despite declining profits.
Religion: 76% Christian (42% Protestant, 33% Catholic), 16% Unaffiliated, 8.4% Jewish, 0.6% Other
Ethnicities: 65.2% White, 19.1% Hispanic, 13.6% Black, 1.1% Asian (incl. 0.4% Japanese-Americans), 0.6% Native American, 0.4% Other
Crime: Crime is growing (5%), especially in urban areas. Rising fastest is violent crime (56% of reported crimes). Most common crimes are theft, robbery, and assault. Petty crime such as shoplifting and pickpocketing remains low. Prostitution remains illegal in all states so far. Drug related crimes are also on the rise (17%). Speculation is growing that organised crime from Latin America and Asia (via the PSA) is spreading in the MSA.
Enforcement: States operate their own police services. Federal level coast guard, army, navy, air force, and marine corps. Military limited by Treaty of Saint Paul to “a force incapable of waging offensive war against its neighbours and disturbing the balance of peace”. This has been interpreted as prohibiting ICBMs, nuclear weapons, aircraft carriers, amphibious craft, and strategic bombers - a view supported by neighbours. Often made/coerced to purchase US/German and PS/Japanese military equipment, often in outdated formats.
Navy: Largely refitted late-war ships, supplemented with some ships bought from Mexico. 60 ships - 1 battleship, 6 destroyers, 6 frigates, 5 corvettes, 8 fast attack craft, 10 mine countermeasure craft, 4 small submarines, 20 misc ships. Marines (7,500 active, 500 reserve) see limited use due to perceived limitations on amphibious warfare.
Air Force: Primarily supplied by McDonnell Aircraft, an almost entirely fighter-based force. No dedicated bombers, only fighter-bombers at best. Some 400 aircraft, 200 of which are combat aircraft. Remainder includes AEW, trainer, and transport.
Army: 170,000 active servicemen, 10,000 main reserve, 20,000 secondary reserve. Largely outdated small arms purchased from USA/PSA. Armored components better matched through indigenous development, though presently lagging 7 years behind neighbors.
Intelligence: Most intelligence work done by four main agencies - the Office of Strategic Services (under the Presidency), the Armed Forces Security Agency (under the Defence Department), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (under the Justice Department), and the Mountain States Secret Service (under the Treasury Department).

Huojin
General Secretary
General Secretary
Posts: 3354
Joined: 07:30:29 Thursday, 02 August, 2012

Re: News Bulletin

Post by Huojin » 20:20:41 Thursday, 26 March, 2015

News

*Following the en masse resignation of Cabinet Liberals and Hard Lefts, the Moderates and Conservatives quickly follow suit. Secretary of the Treasury Robert Eskolm hangs on for longer than most would have expected, but after some dithering eventually announces his mistake in staying and returns home. The constitutional questions continue to deepen, with Brendan Moskin, Secretary of the Interior, standing as next in line to the Presidency. With a Socialist successor unthinkable to most, including himself, Secretary Moskin resigns some weeks after.
*The last Socialist removed, the House of Representatives finally moves. After months of calls for resignation or impeachment, including massive protests, it all comes to a head in a resolution placed before the House calling for articles of impeachment to be drawn up. Back by two Progressives, two Republicans, and a Socialist, it sends ripples throughout the capital, and within hours, before the Speaker has even had time to move the resolution, Paul Edward Roux-Johnson speaks to the nation to announce his resignation.
*The speech is… curiously received - less an apology or concession of fault, more of an indictment of “the hegemony of the corporate media” and the public’s unreadiness for a Socialist government at the time, while calling the motion to impeach him “horrible”. The most clear mention of the Haitian Paper’s situation was a reference made to a “delicate international situation”. Instead of rejuvenating or rehabilitating his image, in the eyes of many it only deepened the concerns about Roux-Johnson’s positions. Calls have been made for the appointment of a special prosecutor as soon as the Justice Department is operating smoothly again to pursue civil law charges against the former-President.
*Roux-Johnson's former Vice President decries the address as “needlessly defensive and unapologetic” but upholds his statements about the integrity of the Coalition and the choice to resign.
*In more optimistic news, with the Cabinet empty and the nation watching on, Montana Senator and President Pro Tempore of the Senate, Joanna Caroline Nelson ascends to the Presidency. As the nation’s first female President, she takes office to also become the fourth President to serve in 1981 - including the first 20 days of the year that continued under President Cargo’s term. It’s a turbulent time for the new President, but despite uncertainty and a dangerous situation internationally, she receives a healthy boost in popularity as a result of her taking over after the depths of Roux-Johnson’s unpopularity.
*Already in filling her shoes, Governor Anthony Springer of Montana, having met with President Nelson, chooses to appoint Edwin Sanders, Chairman of the Montana Progressive Party and a fellow Progressive Moderate. Like his fellow appointee this Congress, Senator Baker (R-WY), he will likely be required to defend his seat in a special election in the 1982 mid-terms.
*In the Senate itself, her role as Pro Tem is controversially assumed by Senator Paula Brewer (S-OK) - the first Socialist to hold that role. Progressive Liberal Senators and Republicans either abstained or neglected the vote entirely, while the assembled Coalition Senators managed to squeeze her appointment through by one vote. Concerns have already been raised about potential bias on bills permitted to pass through the Senate, although the weakened power of the Pro Tem by comparison with the Speaker of the House and Senator Brewer’s moderate stances seem to have convinced most commentators to take the position “what’s the worst that could happen?”.
*One of the first steps of the Nelson Administration is towards transparency - with the release that the Haitian Papers were, despite claims to the contrary, genuine documents drawn up by the Roux-Johnson Administration. They also renounce the Papers entirely, as well as releasing documents showing that the late Charles Stone had no role in them, and that they were the fault of former-President Roux-Johnson. The Press Office of Wallace House also announces their own internal investigation is under way to determine where, if possible, the leak came from.
*Taking positive steps to heal the damaged relations, President Nelson reaches out to allied nations’ ambassadors, as well as becoming the first President since Cargo to visit American allies. Flying briefly both to Mexico City and, notably, to Port-au-Prince, she discusses the furtherance of bilateral relations.
*With Operation Lee still hanging over US-MS relations, the media in both countries has a field day, slinging back and forth insults and accusations of imperialism and aggression, with both sides calling the other’s actions a violation of the Treaty of St Paul. President Nelson takes the opportunity to condemn Operation Lee, coupled with condemnations of attacks by the USA on Mountaineer soil. In Congress a number of bills are proposed in light of US strikes against Mountaineer targets, including a positively received defense review and a less-enthusiastic bill to increase funding to the military. Most notable however is a bill proposed by Progressive Moderates, calling for closure of ports on the Mississippi to shipping from the USA. Although the bill is slow moving, many have speculated that President Nelson may utilise an Executive Order to close the ports.
*Visits are also made by the President early on after her swearing-in to the sites of all three attacks, followed by meetings with the Joint Chiefs about the general state of national defense.
*Former-President Roux-Johnson leads socialist volunteers in Louisiana in gathering donations for the Haitian refugees, taking the time to also visit the site of the US attacks against the naval depot. Despite his substantial unpopularity, he still manages to find some small group of people willing to listen to him talk about the Socialist Defense Policy’s early warning systems and bomb shelters for a few minutes, before making their excuses to be somewhere else.
*Protests are also organised along the MS-US border in Arkansas after the attacks, where right-wing speakers demand “stronger action against the fascist regime”. They’re joined, notably, by discontented left wing supporters, likely drawn by the firm response.
*Also in the area, the Republican Neo-Conservative Caucus announces a political conference in New Orleans, drawing in political figures from the region affected by the US attacks. Neo-Cons take the opportunity to make clear their commitments to anti-racist political dissidents abroad, as well as condemnation of past Progressive support of the KKK.
*The visitors to the sites of the attacks continues, with Congressman Matthew Carpenter (R-OK) visiting Iowa (with Congressmen Goff (R-IA), Pearson (R-IA) and Grant (R-IA) in tow), Arkansas and Louisiana. Crossing through Missouri on the way, the Congressman pays a visit to Phyllis Schlafly, founder of conservative interest group the Eagle Forum. Reaching Louisiana, the Congressman pays a brief visit to the Haitian refugee camps.
*Health crises continue in the Haitian refugee camps in Louisiana. Even as bills are being introduced in Congress to provide assistance in these areas, and to Haiti itself, monitors in the camps report more than 16,000 people currently residing in them, with hundreds having died of disease since arriving. Cases of malnutrition, diarrhoea, typhoid, hepatitis A and E, dengue fever, malaria, meningitis, and so on, are all reported, including odd numbers of diseases like pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and many succumbing to even common sicknesses such as the flu. Concerns about local health issues surface as scattered cases of malaria are reported in Louisianan hospitals not far from the camps.
*A new conservative PAC is established, named “Faith in America”. Centered on the principles of family, faith and freedom, it mixes unashamed social conservatism with support for free market values. As part of fundraising for the PAC, a number of Republican Conservative congressmen make speeches on its behalf.
*Similarly, moderate figures on the right also begin campaigning, establishing a “Mountaineer Advancement PAC”. At the head of the political action committee, Senator Vernon Baker (R-WY) makes use of his position as a leading black figure to stir up support, especially in traditional Southern states like Louisiana.
*Speaking before military and veteran crowds near installations, Senator Baker, a Medal of Honor recipient, talks about the plight of the American people and the dangers of becoming like the USA if free speech is impinged upon. He also speaks out in the south that Louisiana is on the cutting edge of defense, an area he is “heavily invested in”. Some find his comments odd or misplaced, given the recent tragedy in Louisiana, but nevertheless they’re made.
*In Louisiana, the time of year for gubernatorial elections rolls around again, with Governor Mary Killian, a Progressive Liberal, campaigning for re-election in the face of a relatively uneventful three years, and 1981 filled with turmoil for her state. Taking in some 16,000 Haitian refugees in camps, plus coming under attack from US submarine-launched missiles, and having to deal with the fallout of a political scandal that rocked the Coalition. As was normal in Louisiana’s variant on the open primary system, candidates could stand freely in the first round, and if no candidate won more than 50% of the vote, there would be a run-off between the two frontrunners. As a result, some six names were entered on the ballot: Mary Killian (P-L), James F Neeley (R-L), Harlan Johnston (R-M), Harriet Russell (R-C), Mitchell Georges (R-N),David M Ouest (S), and rogue Progressive, Kenneth Landrieu (P-H)
*Through fierce campaigning, and oftentimes slander and allegations (occasionally true) of corruption that often pervade Louisianan elections, David M Ouest fell behind quite substantially in the polls, in part due to local Republican attack pieces. Activity in the area by Senator Baker stirred up Republican Moderate support, especially in the black community. In the last days before the election, Governor Killian came out in favour of Republican Liberal plans current before Congress regarding the movement of Haitian refugees. When ballots came in in early October the results stood as follows;

Killian (P-L) - 36.2%
Johnston (R-M) - 27.6%
Neeley (R-L) - 10.1%
Georges (R-N) - 9.9%
Russell (R-C) - 8.7%
Ouest (S) - 5.6%
Landrieu (P-H) - 2.0%

With the votes on the left of the spectrum, including those going to the rogue Progressive Hard Left candidate who managed to gather an impressive 2.0% without major backing, swinging to Governor Killian, and much of the right vote coalescing behind challenger and State Senator Harlan Johnston, the deciding factor here would be how Republican Liberal votes split. As the months rolled by and the run-off election date came around in December, exit-polling suggested a 49-47 split in favor of Johnston, only 4% undecided. In the end, most of the undecided appear to go to Governor Killian, but it appears to be not enough - she gathers 49.1% of the popular vote, to Johnston’s 50.9%, making her what many believe to be the first high profile casualty of the definitive end of the Coalition’s honeymoon period, if there ever was one.
*Bills laid before the MS Congress to call for the return of citizens held in Canada, and as if in response or defiance, the captured MS Americans are paraded for the newspapers and TV cameras, looking slightly underweight and dishevelled. The Canadian government announces its intentions to try them for espionage and a slew of other charges, including the trafficking of illicit materials. The three young people are identified as Mr. James Denton, Ms. Kathleen Brennan, and Mr. Tom Miller.
*In his native Minnesota, Congressman Joshua Johnson (R-MN) hosts an event requesting the release of the imprisoned MS Americans, and condemning the suppression of free speech by numerous governments - mainly fascist ones, although mention is made of the censorship employed “at home”, in what commentators believe to be a clear nod to the recently-resigned Socialist administration.
*With the changeover in Presidents comes a change over in legislative pace, as a number of bills see progress. Foremost, three new bills as signed into law - the Saving the Buffalo Act, the Comprehensive Agriculture Reform Act, and the Firearm Owners Protection Act. With the first and last of these being Republican initiatives, praise is heaped by the National Rifle Association and the newly-refounded American Bison Society, who begin operating alongside National Park authorities in South Dakota and Montana. They also note the growing progress of tax-break-incentivised bison farming as helping lay the foundations for the population to recover.
*The Comprehensive Agriculture Reform Act (or CARA) is a significantly more complicated, but also major, achievement. Probably the most substantial bill passed this Congress, it notably increased subsidies for farmers who met new conservation guidelines, and provided those too poor to do so alone, as well as establishing a rural development administration and a crop-insurance program. Though criticised by the Republican Party for its reliance on spending more, it was hailed by farmers and agriculture. Steered through Congress by Congressman Wise, former-Vice President Nordquist congratulated his protege, saying “If I had known this is what the American people would accomplish, I would have left Congress a lot sooner.”
*Of note, the former-Vice President, Congressman Wise, and a number of CIAO leaders celebrate on November 2nd (the 43rd anniversary of President Wallace’s election) the signing into law of CARA, with Nordquist speaking to say, “The opposition in our government to this bill drew a line in the sand. Step by step, we braved the fire, and together, we showed that the American people can and will rise above partisan politics and the threats of those who deride the backbone of this great nation as 'freeloaders' and a 'burden on the taxpayer’”
*Some Progressive Conservatives, including Congressman Williams (P-MO), and by association Senators Scott (P-KS) and Ramsey (P-CO), somewhat embarrass themselves in their lacklustre and confused opposition to the bill, and after some reportedly heated arguments in congressional offices, Scott and Ramsey were announced as removed as Chairman and Vice Chairman of the Progressive Conservative caucus, replaced by Congresswoman Karen Miura (P-CO) and Senator Lawrence M Carter (P-MO) in their respective roles.
*Not all is well legislatively, as former-President Roux-Johnson’s much-championed Volunteer bill is killed early on in the session, and a bill concerning the Haitian Papers scandal passes both House and Senate, but the differing versions remain stuck in conference committee.
*Elsewhere the country sees a budget for the first time, as well as a stimulus package. Presented by Congressmen Brand (P-MO) and Wise (P-MN), they are swiftly passed through both House and Senate, despite the protestations of Republican members. These protests soon become clearer in reason, as Senator Perryman (R-NE) details fully the mathematical flaws inherent in the budget calculations, causing consternation in Congress. Nevertheless, the budget and stimulus package are deemed to have passed, and are duly packaged up and sent to President Nelson to be signed. Whether she will is entirely another matter.
*The whole matter shakes somewhat public confidence in the swift movement of the budget, although there remains support for the stimulus package proposed, and most still agree that even with faulty math, this budget is better than no budget, and still improves the deficit.
*Economic concerns still continue elsewhere, as a number of media pieces take up the question of the continuing recession in the MSA. The issue is further complicated when a tax omnibus passes through the House, only to be filibustered by Senator Vernon Baker (R-WY) in the Senate. This didn’t stop a separate exchange being made, with a revision of cloture rules being proposed by Senator Nathan Hanlon (P-TX) after his displeasure with the filibuster proceedings. However with cloture rules being subject to filibuster as well, Coalition hopes continued to evaporate. The tirade went on as Congress wound down for the holidays, with proceedings eventually ended as Capitol Hill packed up and went home for the break - an outcome hailed by businesses in particular.
*In what members of the political left have called “a new purge”, ejections are announced from the Socialist Party; namely Congresswoman Sonja Armstrong (LA), erstwhile face of the Socialist-Workers caucus, and Congresswoman Rita Greer (KS), who some speculate was the victim of being openly in favor of impeaching the President. For both of them, rumors of cooperation with the Republican Party circle. As often follows such a reshuffle, new appointments are also made, with Congressman Ralph M Johnson (S-TX) being named Secretary of Foreign Relations for the Socialist Party. However it quickly becomes apparent he and his fellow Texan Socialist Worker, Darrell Sullivan (S-TX) may well be the only Socialist Workers remaining, as Congresswoman Suzanne Charlton (S-AR) follows her neighbor Armstrong in leaving the Party, as does, more devastatingly, Socialist Senator and fellow Louisianan, Paul C Sherwood.
*The three ousted Socialist Workers unite to form the Independent Socialist Caucus in Congress, while remaining nominally independent. Meanwhile Congresswoman Greer remains an independent alone.
*Senator Rice (R-CO) finds herself tied increasingly in her home state of Colorado to former Secretary of Defense Joseph Cabrini and their both benefitting political from the leak. Though no accusations are made, a lot of metaphorical pointing and eyebrow-wiggling is done, to the Senator’s detriment in the polls.
*To celebrate the re-founding of the American Bison Society and the passage of the Saving the Buffalo Act, a fundraiser for the ABS is held in Kansas City. Attended by conservationists and corporate-connected representatives alike, the Act is hailed as a major success for conservationism and the Beautiful America Committee.
*After his successful talks at the University of Kansas, Senator Goldman (R-KS) goes on a speaking tour of the MSA, repeating the importance (and limitations) of sustainable energy technologies at campuses around the country, as well as the need for American youth involvement in the issue.
*Former-Vice President Nordquist takes up a number of guest lecturing positions at universities, including the University of Minnesota, Texas A&M, and Melbourne Law School in the Commonwealth of Nations, speaking largely on the history of labor law, international relations, and agricultural reform.
*As the nation begins to look back on the Houston Riots with regret, calls continue for federal legislation, particularly to curtail police powers to stop and frisk individuals, as well as calls from other sectors to give governors greater powers to act independent to quell unrest. The black community and other ethnic minority communities call for better laws to protect them from law enforcement as well. Despite all of this, the efforts of Mayor Santos are praised by the community, after his careful balance to maintain ties with both the police and the communities, as well as fostering a sense of reconciliation.
*With Congressman Johnson (S-TX) at the helm of the Socialist Workers’, the Neighborhood Self-Defense Corps expand their activities. In the aftermath of Houston things continue to go awry though, as when the NSDCs intervene to stop a robbery in a tense local area, with a suspect being put in hospital after being shot in the leg and the other suspect and the NSDC member being held in jail. Although the store owner’s pleas sees the man attain favourable bail, it begins a new debate on stand your ground laws.
*Debates around gun laws continue, especially in the light of recent legislation, with the trial of James Riddle beginning. As the man behind the shooting of Mr Paley, the shooter of President Stone, and man with dubious ties, debates continue to rage about new measures to reign in organised crime in the Mountain States.
*In New Mexico, a gang shooting occurs between Hispanics and African-Americans not far from Santa Fe, leaving 5 dead. Police are reportedly pursuing evidence, but suspect that rather than any specific “blank-gone-wrong”, it was a simple clash over territory.
*Attempts to quietly reschedule the World Socialist Forum to Q1 1983 fall apart when right-wing activists and youth organisers appear in New Mexico ahead of the forum and attract media attention to the rescheduling. It’s unclear to what extent this event would have been a draw for debate, as it was cancelled ahead of time.
*In spite of recovering slightly from its recent bad fortunes, May Department Stores troubles are not yet over, with strike events occurring at a number of nationwide locations. They demand an end to the terminations and the rehiring of all fired workers, with some political figures, including Congressman Robertson (S-MN) lambasting the CIAO for not standing up for its members, as well as the executives for earning more than 50 times their average worker per year without bonuses. WIU and Socialist figures also point to expensive cars and homes owned by these executives, while calling for a rally outside May’s national headquarters in the beginning of the new year.
*The event is heavily covered nationally by a new organisation, the Independent Media Association. Operating under the tagline “The IMA brings you the stories the corporate media won’t!”, it acts as a grouping together of various local and community news outlets under a single banner. Closely associated with the Socialist Party, it gains exclusive access to areas the mainstream media isn’t permitted.
*Despite their non-involvement in the May Strikes, CIAO activities do ramp up suddenly, particularly focusing in areas of Texas, New Mexico, and the South.
*The Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC) releases its results in a paper titled “Personal Justice Denied”. In it, it concluded that the incarceration of Japanese Americans had not been justified by military necessity and was instead based on “race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership.” The news is welcomed by Congresswoman Karen Miura (P-CO) and other Japanese-American activists and supporters, including Congressman Wise (P-IA).
*Former Secretary of State Joseph Crocker takes up a position as National Political Consultant for the Progressive National Committee.
*Similarly, former Secretary for Veterans Affairs John H Jacobs joins the Democracy for America PAC as its Veteran’s Advocacy Coordinator.
*After lying relatively dormant, as the year draws to a close the organizational heft of the PNC comes into play, as it plays coordinator and guide for Progressive activities that have been largely independent all year, working alongside political action committees and the CIAO to support Progressives across the country, likely in anticipation of both the coming mid-terms and the need for political strength of late.
*Following his return from a fact-finding mission to Haiti, Congressman Christopher Miller (R-TX) founds the American-Haitian League, a non-profit designed to support the Haitian people in their needs while remaining critical of government policies, and to lobby for aid to Haiti. Progressive Liberals join their Republican fellows in backing this initiative.
*Similarly, Senator Hanlon (P-TX), who also went on the same fact-finding mission, criticises Republican Moderates, Conservatives, and Neo-Conservatives for their lack of engagement on the Haitian issue - a stance he is joined in taking by other prominent Hard Left caucus members, such as Congresswoman Cecelia Ortega (P-TX).
*On a state level, a number of teaching unions begin pushing for reforms to education in state legislatures - especially those dominated by Republicans. Rumors of strikes abound.
*Over Thanksgiving, Conservative leader Matthew Carpenter takes a break to go hunting in Oklahoma with his extended family - which apparently includes a couple of local and regional Republican powerbrokers from time to time.
*Union Pacific Railroad announces its bankruptcy after falling revenues and stock prices become too much to bear. Western Pacific, a company notably responsible for a great deal of trade westwards, buys much of their Pacific-heading line, whilst Aitchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (ATSF) buys the rest.
*With a little nudging from the Left, Bobby Seale becomes something of a minor counter-culture icon, appearing in left-wing press, on posters, shirts, pins, and so on, finding his place amongst the black community and, of course, on college campuses.
*Also on campuses, YPSL members begin attacking Republican student organizations as “tools of the oligarchy, rich kids, and racists”. They clash ideologically and in college newspapers with College Republicans in particular, as well as other right-leaning student organizations.
*Despite a strong start, Republican Patriot news magazine “Don’t Tread On Me” begins to see its readership fall off after a lack of activity.
*Congressman Urquhart (R-MO) launches a public petition for the Missouri History Museum to add a note to the Charles Lindbergh exhibit, making note of his pro-Nazi racial policies. The petition gathers several thousand signatures, though the Museum declines altering its exhibit.
*Information leaks that most of the House Committee on Un-American Activities supports a final report on Standard Oil of California’s actions after finding them not guilty of subversive activities - a view positively received by SOCAL and internationally, even if wholly-domestic oil companies are perhaps a little less enthused.
*Texas Divisionism continues to gain steam as whispers emerge of a proposal for a multi-state system to maintain current university systems and to smooth over transitional issues in a new series of states. A number of research institutions and NGOs comment that such proposals, as long as they maintained the Texan identity, would likely work well. A brief debate touching on the topic finally comes before the state legislatures, where some left wing and some Republican representatives are vocally in support, while more centrist and conservative representatives are firmly against dividing what they see as an indivisible state. The debate looks set to rage on, though the divisionists are certainly gaining ground.

International News

*Mexican Labor Union are praised by the Socialist Party for their role in the revolution, and in turn praise Socialist efforts in the MSA, highlighting the situation with May Department Stores and pledging their support for all the workers of the world.
*A complaint is lodged at the League of Nations about US attacks on MS soil, though most of the assembled fascist delegations typically blame the MSA for violation of its own neutrality. The complaint initially raised by the USA over CNEE also falls apart though, with apathy overwhelming most involved. A condemnation is issued by the General Assembly, the umpteenth of its kind.
*CNEE does, however, readmit Mountaineer scientists from their temporary exclusion - though whether due to government intercession on their behalf or just due to the resignation of Roux-Johnson is unclear.
*As FSLN fighters attempt to undo their previous work in paving the way for new aircraft by attacking airfields and runways themselves, rather than the planes, they launch an attack against to major outposts towards the edge of government-controlled territory near the capital. The attacks are largely successful, but run out of steam before they can make major headway, and are repulsed by mortar and rocket fire. There are, however, whispers of unrest amongst the political elite in Managua.
*Mexican economic liberalisation continues apace, with a new scheme introduced in a limited number of areas that allows farmers maintain individual plot surpluses, rather than giving them to the collective. The scheme proves initially successful, with expectations that it will roll out throughout the country over the next year.
*South Africa’s burgeoning “democracy” (within the ANC, at least) comes under renewed threat, as white terrorist organisation Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging (Afrikaner Resistance Movement) takes credit for a bombing a checkpoint in Pretoria, which left 23 dead. They also conduct a raid on a poorly defended arms depot, making off into the bush with some heavier equipment, much to the dismay of the army.
*The fighting in Haiti continues to worsen, as Tonton Macoutes forces launch another assault on the second city of Haiti, Cap-Haitien. The resolve of government forces, considerably shaken after the first attack, now fails entirely, and they withdraw in panicked disarray from the city. Unwilling to sit by any longer (and possibly due to outside pressure), 200 Cuban instructors/advisors arrive in Port-au-Prince to help stiffen government resolve and prepare their forces to strike back against the Duvalierist militia.
*Agitators for Quebecois sovereignty use the recent provincialist disputes and growing attitudes in favor of autonomy to garner support for their movement. They gain influence in provincial meetings, especially with French backing that comes in the eyes of many as a direct result of the growth of French influence since Britain started down its Road to Albion, leading the government to reinstate “elections” for provincial assemblies.
*US and Canadian troops conduct joint exercises as the year winds to a close, taking part in war games and special winter training camps in the Yukon. Some in Japan look on this with the usual suspicion that it’s a veiled hint at their ability to strike Alaska.
*An illegal labour union strike in the USA after more racial and class tensions is almost broken when hundreds are fired in selected regions. A great many are scared into returning to work, but a significant number still remain - notably both black and white in their origins, though blacks undoubtedly outnumber whites.
*With a new President, the Mountain States Ambassador in Sacramento sends another message to KC, expressing his hopes that something might be done about his situation now.

Mountain States of America
Image

Motto: None
Map: http://i.imgur.com/XdRSari.png
Date: Q4 1981
Population: 46,379,782
Capital: Kansas City

Government:
Executive power vested in the Cabinet, headed by the President. The President is chosen by indirect elections every four years by the Electoral College, running with the Vice President on the same electoral “ticket”. The Cabinet is chosen and serves at the President’s pleasure, and is confirmed by the Senate.

Popularity: 53/100 (+30 New President, +15 Not Roux-Johnson, +10 rejuvenated government, +10 foreign relations boost, -15 not-elected, -5 woman)

President: Joanna Nelson (P-M) - Flamelord
Vice President: [vacant]

Secretary of State: [vacant]
Secretary of the Treasury: [vacant]
Secretary of Defense: [vacant]
Attorney General: [vacant]
Secretary of the Interior: [vacant]
Secretary of Agriculture: [vacant]
Secretary of Commerce: [vacant]
Secretary of Labor: [vacant]
Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare: [vacant]
Secretary of Veterans Affairs: [vacant]

Next Presidential Election: Q4 1984


Legislative power vested in the Mountain States Congress, divided into the Senate (upper chamber) and the House of Representatives (lower chamber). The Senate is chosen by staggered elections every 2 years, divided into 3 classes which are chosen every 6 years. The House of Representatives are re-elected as a whole every 2 years.

Mountain States Senate

President pro tempore: Paula Brewer (S)
Senate Majority Leader: Nathan Hanlon (P-H) - Snacks
Senate Majority Whip: Orval Scott (P-C)
Senate Minority Leader: Franklin Weeks (R-D)
Senate Minority Whip: Vernon Baker (R-M) - BgKnight

Progressives: 14
—Progressive Moderates: 5
—Progressive Liberals: 2
—Progressive Hard Left: 2
—Progressive Conservatives: 5

Republicans: 12
—Republican Moderates: 4
—Republican Conservatives: 3
—Republican Liberals: 3
—Republican Neo-Conservatives: 1
—Republican Patriotic Defense: 1

Socialists: 3
—Socialist: 3
—Socialist Workers: 0

Independents: 1

Mountain States House of Representatives

Speaker of the House: Jeannette Johnson (P-M)
House Majority Leader: Geoffrey Wise (P-L) - Gesar
House Majority Whip: Cecelia Ortega (P-H)
House Minority Leader: Matthew J Carpenter (R-C) - Coinneach
House Minority Whip: Esteban Perez (R-C)

Progressives: 41
—Progressive Moderates: 10
—Progressive Liberals: 14
—Progressive Hard Left: 11
—Progressive Conservatives: 6

Republicans: 35
—Republican Moderates: 12
—Republican Conservatives: 12
—Republican Liberals: 4
—Republican Neo-Conservatives: 5
—Republican Patriotic Defense: 2

Socialists: 11
—Socialist: 9
—Socialist Workers: 2

Independents: 3

Next House of Representatives Election: Q4 1982
Next Senate Class I Election: Q4 1986
Next Senate Class II Election: Q4 1982
Next Senate Class III Election: Q4 1984


Political Parties:

Progressive Party (PNC Chair: Anthony C Nordquist - Gesar)
—Progressive Moderates [Social Liberalism, Progressivism] - Jose Marquez - Flamelord
—Progressive Liberals [Progressivism, Trade Unionism] - Geoffrey Wise
—Progressive Hard Left [Democratic Socialism, Leftist] - Nathan Hanlon - Snacks
—Progressive Conservatives [Neoliberalism, Social Conservatism, Centre-rightist] - Lawrence M Carter (Maddox) and Karen Miura (RinKou)

Republican Party
—Republican Moderates [Social Moderates, Centre-rightist] - Vernon Baker - BgKnight
—Republican Conservatives [Social Conservatism, Rightist] - Matthew J Carpenter - Coinneach
—Republican Liberals [Social Liberalism, Centrist] - Zachary Goldman - Smyg
—Republican Neo-Conservatives [Neoconservatism, Firm Anti-fascism] - Leanna J Freeman - Zar
—Republican Patriotic Defense [Pro-Military, Pro-National Defense, Populism] - Eugene Plawski - Serenissima

Socialist Party
—Socialist [Socialism, Leftist, Trade Unionism] - Philip Donovan - OYID
—Socialist Workers [Far Left, Pro-Mexico, Toledanist] - Paul C Sherwood

Minor Parties:
Workers’ Revolutionary Party [Toledanist, Trotskyist, Anti-Mexico]
Constitutionalist Party [Nationalism, Paleoconservatism, Rightist]
Communist Party USA [Communism, Marxism, Anti-fascism]
Greater United American Way Party [Pro-PSA, Pro-Japan, Militarism, Statism]
American People’s Unity Party [Pro-USA, Pro-German, National Socialism, White Supremacism]


States: 15

Montana
Population: 786,690

Senators:
Republican-M - Class II
Progressive-M - Class I
Representatives: 2
1 Republican - 1 Republican-N
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-M

Overview: Source of some of the largest copper deposits in the world, as well as gold, silver and coal mining. Lumber felling also a source of income.

Wyoming
Population: 469,557

Senators:
Republican-M - Class I
Republican-C - Class II
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-N

Overview: Produces coal, natural gas, oil and uranium, supplemented by agricultural efforts, including livestock, grains, and wool.

Colorado
Population: 2,889,964

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class I
Republican-N - Class III
Representatives: 6
3 Republican - 1 Republican-M, 1 Republican-C, 1 Republican-N
3 Progressive - 2 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-M

Overview: Contains substantial gold and silver mines, as well as natural gas and oil drilling. Machinery and industry also present in large concentrations. Cattle and dairy also common.

New Mexico
Population: 1,303,302

Senators:
Socialist - Class II
Socialist - Class I
Representatives: 3
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-H
1 Republican - 1 Republican-C
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Home to substantial Hispanic population, as a result of Latin American immigration from allied countries. Also holds some of the largest concentrations of Asians in the MSA, a combination of those who fled the war on the Pacific Coast, and more recent immigrants. Growing gang violence and organised crime in urban areas. Substantial copper and uranium mines, as well as oil and natural gas drilling. Agricultural produce includes chiles, pecans, potatoes, and livestock.

North Dakota
Population: 652,717

Senators:
Republican-M - Class III
Republican-L - Class I
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-M

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing cereals, buckwheat, corn, and oilseeds.

South Dakota
Population: 690,768

Senators:
Republican-M - Class II
Republican-C - Class III
Representatives: 1
1 Republican - 1 Republican-C

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, corn, wheat, and soybeans. Also holds tourism draws, such as Mt. Rushmore.

Nebraska
Population: 1,569,825

Senators:
Republican-C - Class I
Republican-L - Class III
Representatives: 3
3 Republican - 1 Republican-M, 1 Republican-C, 1 Republican-D

Overview: Primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, corn, and soybeans.

Kansas
Population: 2,363,679

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class III
Republican-L - Class I
Representatives: 5
3 Progressive - 1 Progressive-M, 1 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-L
1 Republican - 1 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Shares the capital city with Missouri. Outside of the thriving urban centre, primarily an agricultural state, producing livestock, wheat, soybeans, cotton, and more.

Oklahoma
Population: 3,025,290

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class II
Socialist - Class III
Representatives: 6
5 Republican - 3 Republican-M, 2 Republican-C
1 Progressive - 1 Progressive-H

Overview: Hosts the largest concentration of Native Americans in the MSA, as well as a growing Hispanic population as new immigrants make their way north from the border states. Substantial aviation industry interests, as well as oil and natural gas. Largely secondary agricultural sector, including livestock, dairy and wheat.

Texas
Population: 14,229,191

Senators:
Progressive-H - Class I
Progressive-M - Class II
Representatives: 27
11 Progressive - 6 Progressive-H, 3 Progressive-M, 2 Progressive-L
9 Republican - 3 Republican-C, 2 Republican-M, 2 Republican-N, 1 Republican-L, 1 Republican-D
7 Socialist - 5 Socialist, 2 Socialist-W

Overview: Most economically powerful state, producing substantial oil and natural gas. Also home to livestock farming, fisheries, and some crops including cereals and cotton. Has seen growing Hispanic population as immigration (legal and illegal) from allied Latin American countries increases.

Minnesota
Population: 4,075,970

Senators:
Progressive-L - Class I
Progressive-M - Class II
Representatives: 8
5 Progressive - 4 Progressive-L, 1 Progressive-M
2 Republican - 2 Republican-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Substantial agricultural producer, including sugar beets, sweetcorn, poultry, and lumber.

Iowa
Population: 2,913,808

Senators:
Progressive-L - Class II
Republican-D - Class III
Representatives: 6
3 Republican - 3 Republican-C
2 Progressive - 1 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Substantial agricultural producer, including livestock, dairy products, corn, and other crops.

Missouri
Population: 4,916,686

Senators:
Progressive-C - Class I
Progressive-C - Class III
Representatives: 9
6 Progressive - 3 Progressive-L, 2 Progressive-C, 1 Progressive-M
2 Republican - 1 Republican-L, 1 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist

Overview: Shares the capital city with Kansas. Gateway transportation hub between the USA and MSA. Home to substantial aviation industry, as well as light manufacturing and lead and limestone mining.

Arkansas
Population: 2,286,435

Senators:
Progressive-H - Class II
Progressive-M - Class III
Representatives: 4
3 Progressive - 2 Progressive-H, 1 Progressive-L
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist-W

Overview: Strong Southern identity, yet also home to substantial black population. Notable for production of cotton, lumber, automobiles and bauxite.

Louisiana:
Population: 4,205,900

Senators:
Progressive-M - Class II
Socialist-W - Class III
Representatives: 8
5 Progressive - 2 Progressive-M, 2 Progressive-L, 1 Progressive-H
2 Republican - 2 Republican-M
1 Socialist - 1 Socialist-W

Overview: Substantial black population, primarily from post-war refugees and illegal immigrants from the USA. Remaining French influence from colonial era. Has substantial fishing, livestock and agriculture sectors, in addition to industrial sectors producing paper, petroleum and chemicals. Also notable for its film industry (the Hollywood of the South).


Economy:
Finance: Mountain Federal Reserve Bank based in Kansas City issues the Mountain States Dollar (MSD), derived from the old US dollar.

Services: 36.1% GDP, 26.7% labour force. Substantial spread over the sector; main contributors include real estate, aviation, tourism, and transport. 85% private, 10% joint-venture, 5% state-owned.
Industry: 43.9% GDP, 39.1% labour force. Primarily based in mining (copper, gold, silver, coal, sulphur, etc), and oil and gas drilling. Slightly lesser contribution from manufacturing. 70% private, 20% joint-venture, 10% state-owned.
Agriculture: 20.0% GDP, 29.2% labour force. Increasingly dominated by large companies and businesses. Improving mechanisation also leading to falling employment in this sector. 95% private, 5% joint-venture.
Unemployment: 5% (1.7% frictional, 3.3% structural)

Credit Rating: AA
Outlook: Stable

Government Budget
Treasury: 187 credits
Gold Reserves: [audited, >500]
Surplus: -30 (315 Revenue - 345 Expenditure)

Revenue: +315

Tax: +275 credits
Income Tax: +110
—Working Class - Somewhat Low: +48
—Middle Class - Somewhat Low: +36
—Upper Class - Moderate: +26

Social Insurance: +82 credits
Crop Insurance: +1 credits

Corporation Tax: +54 credits (544 Private Sector/10) [rounded up]

Trade Tariffs: +28
USA: +6 credits
PSA: +6 credits
Canada: +6 credits
Mexico: +10 credits


Public Corporations: +40
Post Service: -10 credit (+0 profit - 10 running cost)
State-owned industry: +30 credit (+50 profit - 20 running cost)
State-owned services: +20 credits (+40 profit, -20 running cost)
Mountain Federal Reserve Bank: +10 credit (+20 profit, - 10 running cost)
Public Housing: -10 credits (+20 profit, -30 running cost)

Expenditure: -345 credits
Defense: -20 credits
—Army: -10
—Navy & Marines: -5
—Air Force: -5
Social Protection: -49 credits
—Pensions: -11
—Income Support: -12
—Housing Subsidies: -8
—Family Allowances: -7
—Food Stamps: -5
—Orphans: -3
—Disability: -3
Health: -50 credits
—Health Insurance: -37
—Hospitals: -9
—Wages: -4
Education: -40 credits
—Public Schools: -23
—Private Subsidies: -6
—Colleges & Universities: -5
—Wages: -6
Public Order: -17 credits
—Police: -4
—Police Wages: -2
—Courts: -3
—Court Wages: -2
—Prisons: -5
—Prison Wages: -1
Infrastructure: -44 credits
—Road Maintenance: -9
—Railroad Subsidies: -10
—Airport Subsidies: -5
—Water Costs: -10
—Water Imports: -10
Industry: -9 credits
—Subsidies: -3
—Loans: -4
—Regulation: -2
Agriculture: -25 credits
—Subsidies: -16
—Loans: -5
—Education: -1
—Administration: -3
Energy: -50 credits
—Subsidies: -10
—PSA Imports: -17
—USA Imports: -14
—Canada Imports: -9
Government: -14 credits
—State: -5
—Local: -4
—Administrative: -2
—Intelligence: -1
—Wages: -2
Veterans: -9 credits
—Pensions: -4
—Education: -2
—Rehabilitation: -2
—Loans: -1
Science & Technology: -12 credits
—Defense: -5
—Health: -3
—General Science: -2
—Agriculture: -1
—Energy: -1
Culture: -5 credits
—Art: -1
—Music: -1
—Humanities: -1
—Literature: -1
—Other: -1
Debt Interest: 0 credits

Debt: 367 credits (85 owed to USA, 85 owed to PSA, 136 owed to domestic banks)
Interest rate: 20% per annum
Interest Payments: 0 credits per annum
Debt Ceiling: 400 credits

Private Sector: +544
Major Industries:
Power: +40 credits
Telecommunications: +50 credits
Transportation: +58 credits
Oil and Gas: +119 credits
Mining: +90 credits
Manufacturing: +58 credits
Agriculture: +104 credit

OTHER: +25 credits

Trade Unionism and Labor Rules

Trade Unions: 42.5% working population unionised.
Right to organise and collectively bargain protected by legislation. Child labour laws in place. Right to strike protected and largely unlimited; with no ballot required, no limits on supporting strikes, and no limits on flying pickets.

Congress of Industrial and Agricultural Organizations - Represents 20.7% working population. Progressive Party aligned, particularly the Liberal faction. Draws support from primarily from agriculture, with less representation in oil, mining, manufacturing, etc. Solid backing from service and public sector workers.
Workers’ International Union - Represents 21.8% working population. Socialist Party aligned, spread across the whole spectrum. Strong representation in industry, especially oil and natural gas, mining, and manufacturing of all sorts.

Minimum wage in place set by federal government, must be raised by Congress. States may set their own minimum wages in accordance with federal law.
Federal Minimum Wage: 70% Living Wage, 20% for tipped workers
Retirement Age: 66

Life:

Health: Fully subsidised universal healthcare, based around a compulsory social insurance plan. Hospital standards are high and provide comprehensive healthcare to most of the population, although waiting times and inefficiencies are high. Majority of hospitals privately owned and run. Health issues faced by the population primarily include obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and other non-infectious disease. Growing instances of drug abuse-related illness. Abortion rights fall under the right to privacy (Doe v. Wade), and is permitted until viability (except for health reasons). Average life expectancy: 76.
Housing: Urban population continues to grow due to mechanisation of substantial agricultural sector. Particularly in southern cities (NM, OK, AK, LA, TX), overcrowding is growing and standards of living are slipping, resulting in inner city poverty. Seriously falling standards of living continue to affect the Native American population.
Water: Clean, safe water provided to ~100% of population. Reservoirs throughout the country, primarily in the Missouri River watershed. Imports some fresh water from Canada to meet demands (20-45%, depending on needs).
Electricity: Net power importer. Exports oil, natural gas, and coal to the PSA and USA to meet their energy needs, while importing cheaper electricity in return due to treaty limitations on MSA power production capacity. MSA-based stations produce 30% energy needs, 30% from PSA plants, 25% from USA plants, 15% from Canadian plants. Processes Mexican oil and coal into energy and derivative products, which it sells back to Mexico (65% Mexican energy needs). Energy demands rising.
Education: 97.3% literacy. Universal primary education. 73% secondary enrolment rate, capacity to handle 90%. 21% university enrolment rate, capacity to handle 39%.
Transportation: Extensive transport links throughout the country. Air transportation services domestic and international passenger and cargo flights. Most common services to Mexico, the Caribbean, Australasia, the PSA and USA. Unofficial national carrier is Transcontinental & Western Air (TWA). Highways connect states all across the nation, with high private car ownership. Extensive privately owned rail services, primarily taking cargo throughout North America, with most private operators maintaining some passenger lines, despite declining profits.
Religion: 70% Christian (37% Protestant, 33% Catholic), 21% Unaffiliated, 8.4% Jewish, 0.6% Other
Ethnicities: 65.2% White, 19.1% Hispanic, 13.6% Black, 1.1% Asian (incl. 0.4% Japanese-Americans), 0.6% Native American, 0.4% Other
Crime: Crime is growing (5%), especially in urban areas. Rising fastest is violent crime (56% of reported crimes). Most common crimes are theft, robbery, and assault. Petty crime such as shoplifting and pickpocketing remains low. Prostitution remains illegal in all states so far. Drug related crimes are also on the rise (17%). Speculation is growing that organised crime from Latin America and Asia (via the PSA) is spreading in the MSA.
Enforcement: States operate their own police services. Federal level coast guard, army, navy, air force, and marine corps. Military limited by Treaty of Saint Paul to “a force incapable of waging offensive war against its neighbours and disturbing the balance of peace”. This has been interpreted as prohibiting ICBMs, nuclear weapons, aircraft carriers, amphibious craft, and strategic bombers - a view supported by neighbours. Often made/coerced to purchase US/German and PS/Japanese military equipment, often in outdated formats.
Navy: Largely refitted late-war ships, supplemented with some ships bought from Mexico. 60 ships - 1 battleship, 6 destroyers, 6 frigates, 5 corvettes, 8 fast attack craft, 10 mine countermeasure craft, 4 small submarines, 20 misc ships. Marines (7,500 active, 500 reserve) see limited use due to perceived limitations on amphibious warfare.
Air Force: Primarily supplied by McDonnell Aircraft, an almost entirely fighter-based force. No dedicated bombers, only fighter-bombers at best. Some 400 aircraft, 200 of which are combat aircraft. Remainder includes AEW, trainer, and transport.
Army: 170,000 active servicemen, 10,000 main reserve, 20,000 secondary reserve. Largely outdated small arms purchased from USA/PSA. Armored components better matched through indigenous development, though presently lagging 7 years behind neighbors.
Intelligence: Most intelligence work done by four main agencies - the Office of Strategic Services (under the Presidency), the Armed Forces Security Agency (under the Defence Department), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (under the Justice Department), and the Mountain States Secret Service (under the Treasury Department).

Locked

Return to “Mountain States of America”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests