The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

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Luc
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The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by Luc » 22:35:29 Sunday, 01 October, 2017

So, lets get this shit on the road...

Following the sinking of several Brazilian merchant ships in the Atlantic, the United States of Brazil declared war against the German Empire and its allies in the Central Powers. The declaration proved to be a widely unpopular move. One one side, the large amounts of German & Austrian immigrants living in Brazil protested the action, calling it an attack against their ethnicity, while on the other hand, Communist and Syndicalist movements across Brazil, who already denounced the war as a pointless ordeal of imperialist aggression even before Brazil’s declaration of war, greatly protested the move.

Brazil’s military contribution to the war was small, with only a few ships being put on patrol and a small medical corps being sent to aid in the Western front, yet the country played a vital role in the Entente’s war effort: Food. As one of the most fertile nation’s in the globe, Brazil quickly took its role as the breadbasket of the Entente, feeding the millions of soldiers in the frontlines with its food. With the majority of food being exported, the price for food rapidly rose in the country, with most wages failing to keep up with the rapidly increasing cost. Protests spread across the nation, with the workers and the people openly protesting the war in the streets and in the workplace, protests that would lead to the greatest general strike the country had ever seen.

Following the death of a worker during a protest in São Paulo (killed during a cavalry charge carried out against a group of protesting workers), thousands of workers abandoned their factories and took to the streets in protest, paralyzing most of the industry & commerce in São Paulo. Over the course of the next days, the movement would spread across the nation, and a general strike was officially declared. Led by Edgard Leuenroth, Astrojildo Pereira and other prominent leaders of Brazil’s left wing movement, the strikers fought the police and the army in the streets for over a week, raising barricades, invading property and surrounding government buildings. After many days of siege, terms were reached between the protesters and the state government, establishing an immediate raise in salaries and better work conditions, resulting in a resounding victory for the protesters.

The positive outcome of the 1917 general strike solidified the left. In the beginning of 1918, inspired by the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia, the Brazilian communists and anarchists joined together to form the so called ‘Libertarian Socialist Party’, to spearhead proletarian revolution in the republic. While most members were optimistic about the Party’s future, its first move proved to be a fatal mistake, as the 1918 Anarchist rising, a nationwide revolution led by the party, failed miserably and resulted in the imprisonment of most of its leadership and the exile of the rest, including Leuenroth himself who was forced to flee to Argentina. The failed uprising would cause a large rift between the remains of the party, as the Anarchist and Communist elements started to grow apart. Unhappy with the Anarchists for the conduct of the 1918 rising, and pressured by the Comintern, the Communists left the party and founded the Communist Party of Brazil. Other socialist elements, such as those who would later found the Socialist Revolutionary Party, would also leave the Party, leaving the Anarchists alone. Leuenroth, now the official leader of the Brazilian Workers Confederation in exile, would officially dissolve the party in 1921.

The strikes proved to have long lasting effects in the federal government. It showed that the revolutionary left had the full capability of setting up a significant resistance to the government if meddled with. The catastrophic outbreak of the Spanish flu in the country, which even claimed the life of the President at the time, would further worsen the already delicate situation. Albeit, Brazil managed to evade any major revolts, keeping the peace in the nation. Then the lieutenants came…

The Lieutenants, or Tenentes as they were called, were a group of army officers who were displeased with the Republic’s social backwardness and de facto oligarchic nature. They wanted to break the control that the large landowners and traditional politicians had over the Republic, and bring forward meaningful social reform. Their revolt started in July 1922, with a mutiny in the nation’s capital, as 18 lieutenants marched out of the Copacabana fort to depose the federal government. Quite obviously, those 18 soldiers had no chance of deposing the government on their own (given that there were over 3,000 pro-government troops in the capital alone), and 16 of the 18 mutineers were killed in the streets, with the two surviving officers, Eduardo Gomes and Siqueira Campos, being arrested. The real objective of the fort mutineers was to influence other army regiments across the country to rise in a similar revolt, transforming the small scale mutiny into a nationwide uprising against the federal government. Following the ‘March of the 18’ (as the insurrection was to know), over 200 revolted soldiers remained in the fort refusing to surrender to the government, what followed was to become one of the most dramatic moments in the republic’s history, as the Federal troops besieged the fort for many weeks, even using naval bombardments from the navy’s dreadnoughts and the first aerial bombing in Latin American history to force the rebels to submit.

The original March has some effect in the army across the nation, with a few regiments in Rio and São Paulo joining in the struggle, yet it was the dramatic siege to the fort that really sparked revolt among the officer class of the republic, many whom found themselves fighting the rebels in the Federal ranks. Not long after, the Copacabana Fort would fall to government troops and the remaining officers would be detained, yet it proved to be too late, as the news had spread and across the country, and from South to North-east, army regiments across the country were joining their fallen comrades in revolt. The situation became so delicate that the government was forced to declare martial law across the republic.

In November 1922, Artur Bernardes rose to the presidency, finding a nation torn apart by the army revolts. Military strikes became common, as the regiments started to form soldier’s councils that basically ran themselves, electing their own officers and deciding their own stance in regards to the growing unrest within the country. While most councils were loyal to the lieutenants, many started to declare allegiance to the left wing movements in Brazil, such as the anarchists or the communists. The situation continued to deteriorate, revolts erupted in São Paulo, Rio Grande do Sul and in the impoverished states of the Northeast in 1923, which the government was able to contain but at a huge cost.

The real revolution would begin however in the 1st of July, 1924, when President Bernardes was shot and killed by an anarchist in the steps of the Brazilian senate building in the capital of Rio de Janeiro. The death of the President would re-ignite the revolutionary zeal within the Republic, this time not only from the lieutenants, but from the revolutionary left, that since the failed 1918 rising had been licking their wounds behind the scenes, waiting for a new opportunity to strike. Rebellions rose across the country, as the lieutenants carried out a Revolution in the State of São Paulo and for many months held effective control over the industrial heartland of Brazil. The communists took over other cities, forming communes and their own local governments, most famous of which being the Manaus Commune, established in a rare moment of cooperation between the lieutenants and the left wing revolutionaries. Other revolts across the country, such as the ones seen in Aracaju, Volta Redonda and Bela Vista, also took place. Most famous of all the revolts, was the one in Rio Grande do Sul led by Luis Carlos Prestes, a young lieutenant with left wing ideals who would later on lead a column of revolutionaries in an epic march across the country.

With Bernardes dead, came the time for his Vice-President, Estacio Coimbra, to take charge. Coimbra, despite being a seasoned politician, quickly lost control of the situation and desperately searched for a way to deal with this crisis. His solution came in one person: Washington Luis. Luis had quickly risen to become one of the most famous politicians in Brazil, starting his political career as a City Councilor for São Paulo in 1897, he would grow in influence and rank, serving as the mayor of São Paulo during the 1917 general strike (where his conduct of the crisis was greatly praised) and then as the governor of the State of São Paulo, where he effectively controlled the original lieutenant unrest in 1922 with much success. He had recently been elected to serve as a Federal Senator for his beloved state in the capital of the Republic. Coimbra, seeing the man as one of the few people who could solve the crisis, invited Luis to serve as his Vice-President and, following a quick election in the Senate, indirectly elected him to the role.

Coimbra would remain as President of the Republic until the end of his dead predecessors term in 1926, yet from the election of Washington Luis onwards he would simply remain as the figurehead of the government, with the Vice President really ruling over the nation. Luis was quick to act, he marshalled the army units still loyal to the government and crushed rebellions in São Paulo and other states (even visiting the frontlines several times), forming an effective opposition to the revolts. He even kept Brazil in the League of Nations, as a way to attempt to gather support for his government internationally.Upon the end of Coimbra's tenure in 1926, Washington Luis was the obvious candidate for the presidency. Due to the state of revolt the country found itself in, an internal election was held by the legislature, and by a healthy majority, Luis was elected President of the Republic.

Other figures of note took part in the civil war as well. Luis Carlos Prestes would lead his column of revolutionaries, supported by Eduardo Gomes and other famous lieutenants, across the country from south to north, rallying the peasantry and the workers into revolt, fighting back all of the government attacks that failed to bring down his column. Astrojildo Pereira, leading the communist Party, took active part in the battles and coordinated the establishment of several communes across the country, leading the communist forces in the war. Leuenroth, despite being exiled in Paraguay, led the anarchist and syndicalist efforts in the conflict, marshalling the worker movements through his leadership of the Brazilian Workers confederation. Getúlio Vargas, the famous politician from the South, would form his own militia of soldiers, the so called ‘Public Force’, that would march north from the state of Rio Grande do Sul to fight the lieutenants and the left wing groups with extreme violence and efficiency. Vargas would become such an important figure in the Government’s war effort in fact, that Luis made him his government’s Minister of War, starting an even more violent crackdown of the insurgents. Julio Prestes (not related to Luis Carlos Prestes), the governor of the State of São Paulo and an old ally of Washington Luis, also played a pivotal role in the conflict by assuring federal control over the state of São Paulo. Plinio Salgado, a known fascist, integralist and admirer of Mussolini, would lead his own militia against the rebels, violently cracking down on their activities across the country. His militia would shortly thereafter be reformed into a political party, the Brazilian Integralist Action.

By 1928, the war had grown into a stalemate. Besides the best efforts by the rebels, the strong administration established by Luis, alongside the support given by Prestes and Vargas, proved to be too strong to topple. On the other side, the rebels had also gained too much strength, meaning that a total capitulation of their movement would be literally impossible. Luis recognized this, and in a very controversial move, called the rebel leaders to discuss terms. The result would be the Ribeirão Preto accords of 1928. In it, the civil war would be effectively ended, but huge costs for the federal government. Political parties such as the Communist Party, the Socialist Revolutionary Party and the Brazilian Workers Confederation, that had been banned during the 1920s, would be once again legalized. All the members that took part in the revolt or in any previous insurrection, including the general strike of 1917 and the revolution of 1918, would receive amnesty and have all their political rights restored. Trade Unions would be allowed to resume their previous activities, freedom of the press would be guaranteed, work regulations were to become harsher and a 5 day work week was to be established.

The accords were controversial for both sides. The leftists were satisfied with the results due to the large concessions given to them by the government, yet there were those who said that the main reason for the revolution in the first place, the objective of breaking the control of the republican party over the country and ending the bi-partisan power sharing scheme (the Coffee with Milk policy) in the republic, had not been achieved. On the other side, Luis was praised for ending the war ‘peacefully’ and bringing back some sort of stability to the republic, yet he was harshly criticised for perhaps giving too many concessions to the rebels. Among the opposition, the biggest voices were Plinio Salgado and Getulio Vargas, who even resigned his ministerial position in protest.

Controversial as it was, peace was achieved, and Luis was ready to pursue his own governmental policy. Since the Rise of the Republic in 1889, Brazilian politics had been controlled by the Republican Party, yet the party was not a centralised one, with each Brazilian states having its own branch of the Party. Luis had taken part in a failed attempt to form a national republican party in the end of the 19th century, and the will to reform that party had always remained with him. He saw the end of the war and his powerful position as President and leader of the Republican Party of São Paulo as the optimal opportunity to bring all the parties together.

All the Republican Parties met in the city of Ouro Preto discuss the possible union and select the presidential candidate for the upcoming election. The party had divided itself into 3 major blocks, those who supported Luis, Vargas and Julio Prestes respectively. Luis already expected Vargas to be uncooperative, and resulted to his old friend Julio Prestes for assistance. The two men hatched a deal, Prestes was to support Luis’ plan of uniting the party and give him the Presidency of the Party, yet Prestes was to be the official Party candidate for the election.

It came time to vote, and in shocking twist, Luis presented himself as a candidate for the upcoming election, betraying the deal that had been established between the two men. The reason for the betrayal is still unclear, and speculation is large. The vote was extremely close, but in the end Luis had a small majority over the two candidates, with Prestes falling in second place and Vargas shortly behind at 3rd. Vargas and his delegates abandoned the conference, claiming that the vote had been rigged, and Prestes, outraged over Luis’ betrayal, also abandoned the conference. Luis then guided the remaining delegates under his influence and formed the Federal Republican Party, his so-expected union, now only with one third of its original size.

The other men of the conference were quick to act. Vargas returned to his home state of Rio Grande do Sul to resume his tenure as Governor, and there he forms the National-Liberal Alliance, his own political party composed of his followers. Julio Prestes returns to São Paulo and forms the Liberal Democratic Party. With the peace, the Integralists form themselves into the Brazilian Integralist Action, the Communists reform themselves and once again rise in the national political spectrum, Leuenroth returns to Brazil after over 10 years of exile to once again command the Worker’s confederation and the lieutenants, led by Luis Carlos Prestes and Eduardo Gomes, form the Movement for Popular Action, based off the traditional tenentist ideals.

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So I welcome you all to 'The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim', a traditional nation sim set in a slightly alternate history version of 1920's Brazil, to be held right here on molotov! I was planning on posting this only with the final stats ready, but I decided to start signups a little earlier, to gather more interest along the way. Statsfor the game will be posted here shortly.

In this game, players will play Political Parties, Militia's, Specific Government agencies and pecific individuals. You may select any of the below to play as! If you would like to play an institution or someone not found here, contact me, and we will figure stuff out.

POLITICAL PARTIES:
POLITICAL PARTIES:Show
Federal Union Party (Partido da União Federal) (PUF) (Flamelord)
Party Ideology: Agrarianism, Conservatism, Center-Right
Party Leader: Washington Luis
Brief Description: Made of the conservative elements of the old Republican Parties of Brazil under the leadership of President Luis. Most tradicionalist Party, defendig the rights and priviledges of the landowners and the top 1% of Brazilian society. Opposed to Liberal & Left-wing reforms. The party of the status-quo.

Liberal Democratic Party (Partido Liberal Democrata) (PLD) (Red John)
Party Ideology: Liberalism, Progressive Democratic, Center
Party Leader: Julio Prestes
Brief Description: Social & Economic liberals progressivists under the leadership of the Governor of São Paulo Julio Prestes. Formed after the failure of the Ouro Preto Conference. Greatly popular with the urban middle class and the business community of Brazil.

National Liberal Alliance (Aliança Nacional Liberal) (ANL) (Westar)
Party Ideology: Liberalism, Populism, Center
Party Leader: Getulio Vargas
Brief Description: Liberal Populists under the leadership of the Governor of Rio Grande do Sul Getulio Vargas. Extremely in favour of Social reforms related to labour, pensions, welfare and female voting rights. Very popular with the lower class of Brazil, especially in the North-east regions.

Social Democratic Party (Partido Social Democrata) (PSD) (Acecipher)
Party Ideology: Social-Democracy, Liberalism, Center
Party Leader: Fernando de Sousa Costa
Brief Description: Social Democratic Party recently formed in 1925. Heavily inspired by German/Weimar Social Democratic policies, especially in relation to welfare. Popular with the educated urban middle class.

Democratic Party (Partido Democrata) (PD)
Party Ideology: Liberalism, Center-Right
Party Leader: José Adriano Marrey Júnior
Brief Description: Founded in 1925 from Republican Party dissidents. Despite being liberals, they mostly defend the interests of traditional families related to the agricultural market in Brazil.

Liberator Party (Partido Libertador) (PL) (LordMoose)
Party Ideology: Conservatism, Parliamentarism, Center-Right
Party Leader: Joaquim Francisco de Assis Brasil
Brief Description: Traditional and Conservative party from the South of Brazil, strong defenders of state authority and parliamentarism.

Brazilian Communist Party (Partido Communista Brasileiro) (PCB) (Smyg)
Party Ideology: Communism, Marxism-Leninism, Far Left
Party Leader: Astrojildo Pereira
Brief Description: Formed in 1921 after the split with the anarchists/syndicalists. Developed strong ties to the Soviet Union and the Comintern. Took extensive part in the civil war during the 1920's, coordinating much of the action against the Federal government. Recently legalized again after the truce with the government. Popular with the urban, lower class Proletariat.

Socialist Revolutionary Party (Partido Socialista Revolucionario) (PSR)
Party Ideology: Socialism, Left
Party Leader: João Mangabeira
Brief Description: Formed after the 1921 split by the moderate Socialist faction of the party. Grew to become the favoured party of the left wing/socialist urban intelligentsia. Took part in the civil war against the federal government. Recently legalized after the truce with the government.

Brazilian Worker's Confederation (Confederação Brasileira dos Trabalhadores) (CBT) (Marankara)
Party Ideology: Anarcho-Communism, Syndicalism, Far Left
Party Leader: Edgard Leuenroth
Brief Description: The remains of the Libertarian Socialist Party. Hold great control over the industrial cooperatives and trade unions in the larger urban centers. Resumed normal activities following the truce with the Federal Governemnt.

Proletarian Unification Party (Partido da Unificação Proletaria) (PUP)
Party Ideology: Trotskyism, Far Left
Party Leader: Mário Pedrosa
Brief Description: Formed by Trotskyist members of the Communist Party after their expulsion in 1926. Had some participation in the civil war. Legalized following the truce with the government.

Workers & Peasants Block (Bloco Operário e Camponês) (BLOC)
Party Ideology: Anarcho-Communism, Far Left
Party Leader: João da Costa Pimenta
Brief Description: Anarcho-Communist group that focuses in the Brazilian peasantry, being one of the few left wing parties in Brazil that was able to find some representation with the uneducated peasantry. Fought alongside the other left wings group in the civil war. Recently legalized again by the truce.

Brazilian Integralist Action (Ação Integralista Brasileira) (AIB) (Flaming Bolshevik)
Party Ideology: Integralism, Fascism, Far Right
Party Leader: Plínio Salgado
Brief Description: Far right group inspired by Italian fascism and German National-Socialism. Rapidly growing in the anti-left communities of Brazil. Fought alongside Federal troops against the lieutenants and the leftists in the Civil War.

Movement for Popular Action (Movimento da Ação Popular) (MAP) (Serenissima)
Party Ideology: Reformism, Tenentism, Centre
Party Leaders: Luis Carlos Prestes, Eduardo Gomes
Brief Description: Movement composed of the leadership of the lieutenants formed following the end of the Civil War. Still hold a great amount of influence over the army regiemnts across Brazil. Speculation regarding if they will become a political party in the future is large.

Brazilian Patrianovist Imperial Action (Ação Imperial Patrianovista Brasileira) (AIPB) (DutchGuy)
Party Ideology: Monarchism, Conservatism, Right
Party Leaders: Pedro Henrique de Orléans e Bragança, Arlindo Veiga dos Santos
Brief Description: Recently formed pro-monarchist movement, wishing to restore the Brazilian empire originally deposed in the 1889 coup. Still very small, but slowly growing.
IMPORTANT CHARACTERS:
IMPORTANT CHARACTERSShow

Lampião - Famous bandit, outlaw and Robin Hood-esque figure of north eastern Brazil. (Gesar)
Percival Farquhar - Rich American business with strong interests in Brazil. (Carpe Verpa)
João Neves da Fontoura - Director of Brazil's Political Police.
Francisco Campos - National Director of the Federal Department of Public Security.
Setembrino de Carvalho - Commanding Officer of the Brazilian Military Police.
Eurico Gaspar Dutra - Commander-in-Chief of the Brazilian Army High Command.
Isaías de Noronha - First Admiral of the Navy.
Rafael Franco - Paraguayan military officer, exiled in Brazil after carrying out a failed coup d'etat. (Robert Schumann)
Horácio de Matos - Rich landowner in the Northeast of the country, holds great influence in those territories. (Coin)
That will be all for now, sign up away! If there are any questions, ask right away!
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STATS
GAME STATSShow
"Brazil fears nothing in the Present, prides itself on the Past and relies, serenely, on the Future." - Getulio Vargas

Stats:

Republic of the United States of Brazil (Republica dos Estados Unidos do Brasil)
Image
Motto: Order and Progress (Ordem e Progresso)
Map: http://www.mapas-historicos.com/atlas-1 ... antigo.jpg
Date: Q2, 1929
Population: 35,405,925
Size: 8,515,767 sq km

Foreign Relations:

United States of America - Good relations (67/100). Old allies, frequent Trade partners.
United Kingdom - Moderate Relations (52/100). Frequent trade partners, minor border disputes with Guyana.
French Republic - Very Good relations (77/100). Old friendship, frequent trade partners, constant military cooperation.
Argentina - Poor Relations (46/100). Old Arms Race, Border Disputes, Traditional Rivals, ABC Pact.
Chile - Good Relations (65/100). Frequent Trade partners, shared rivalry with Argentina, ABC Pact.
Uruguay - Moderate Relations (54/100). Border Tensions, Local Trade Partners.

Government:

System: Presidential Republic (Officialy); Oligarch Republic (de facto)
Current Popularity: 41%

Constitution of 1891 - http://www.planalto.gov.br/ccivil_03/Co ... icao91.htm

President: Washington Luís
Vice-President: Fernando de Melo Viana

Minister of Agriculture, Industry and Commerce: Geminiano Lira Castro
Minister of Finance: Francisco Chaves de Oliveira Botelho
Minister of War: Nestor Sezefredo dos Passos
Minister of Justice and Internal Affairs: Augusto Viana do Castelo
Minister of the Navy: Arnaldo de Siqueira Pinto da Luz
Minister of Foreign Affairs: Otávio Mangabeira
Minister of Transportation & Public Works: Vítor Konder

Political Parties:

Federal Union Party (Partido da União Federal) (PUF) (Flamelord)
Party Ideology: Agrarianism, Conservatism, Center-Right
Party Leader: Washington Luis
Brief Description: Made of the conservative elements of the old Republican Parties of Brazil under the leadership of President Luis. Most tradicionalist Party, defendig the rights and priviledges of the landowners and the top 1% of Brazilian society. Opposed to Liberal & Left-wing reforms. The party of the status-quo.

Liberal Democratic Party (Partido Liberal Democrata) (PLD) (RedJohn)
Party Ideology: Liberalism, Progressive Democratic, Center
Party Leader: Julio Prestes
Brief Description: Social & Economic liberals progressivists under the leadership of the Governor of São Paulo Julio Prestes. Formed after the failure of the Ouro Preto Conference. Greatly popular with the urban middle class and the business community of Brazil.

National Liberal Alliance (Aliança Nacional Liberal) (ANL) (Westar)
Party Ideology: Liberalism, Populism, Center
Party Leader: Getulio Vargas
Brief Description: Liberal Populists under the leadership of the Governor of Rio Grande do Sul Getulio Vargas. Extremely in favour of Social reforms related to labour, pensions, welfare and female voting rights. Very popular with the lower class of Brazil, especially in the North-east regions.

Social Democratic Party (Partido Social Democrata) (PSD) (Acecipher)
Party Ideology: Social-Democracy, Liberalism, Center
Party Leader: Fernando de Sousa Costa
Brief Description: Social Democratic Party recently formed in 1925. Heavily inspired by German/Weimar Social Democratic policies, especially in relation to welfare. Popular with the educated urban middle class.

Democratic Party (Partido Democrata) (PD)
Party Ideology: Liberalism, Center-Right
Party Leader: José Adriano Marrey Júnior
Brief Description: Founded in 1925 from Republican Party dissidents. Despite being liberals, they mostly defend the interests of traditional families related to the agricultural market in Brazil.

Liberator Party (Partido Libertador) (PL) (LordMoose)
Party Ideology: Conservatism, Parliamentarism, Center-Right
Party Leader: Joaquim Francisco de Assis Brasil
Brief Description: Traditional and Conservative party from the South of Brazil, strong defenders of state authority and parliamentarism.

Brazilian Communist Party (Partido Communista Brasileiro) (PCB) (Smyg)
Party Ideology: Communism, Marxism-Leninism, Far Left
Party Leader: Astrojildo Pereira
Brief Description: Formed in 1921 after the split with the anarchists/syndicalists. Developed strong ties to the Soviet Union and the Comintern. Took extensive part in the civil during the 1920', coordinating much of the action against the Federal government. Recently legalized again after the truce with the government. Popular with the urban, lower class Proletariat.

Socialist Revolutionary Party (Partido Socialista Revolucionario) (PSR)
Party Ideology: Socialism, Left
Party Leader: João Mangabeira
Brief Description: Formed after the 1921 split by the moderate Socialist faction of the party. Grew to become the favoured party of the left wing/socialist urban intelligentsia. Took part in the civil war against the federal government. Recently legalized after the truce with the government.

Brazilian Worker's Confederation (Confederação Brasileira dos Trabalhadores) (CBT) (Marankara)
Party Ideology: Anarcho-Communism, Syndicalism, Far Left
Party Leader: Edgard Leuenroth
Brief Description: The remains of the Libertarian Socialist Party. Hold great control over the industrial cooperatives and trade unions in the larger urban centers. Resumed normal activities following the truce with the Federal Governemnt.

Proletarian Unification Party (Partido da Unificação Proletaria) (PUP)
Party Ideology: Anarcho-Communism, Syndicalism, Far Left
Party Leader: Mário Pedrosa
Brief Description: Formed by Trotskyist members of the Communist Party after their expulsion in 1926. Had some participation in the civil war. Legalized following the truce with the government.

Workers & Peasants Block (Bloco Operário e Camponês) (BLOC)
Party Ideology: Anarcho-Communism, Far Left
Party Leader: João da Costa Pimenta
Brief Description: Anarcho-Communist group that focuses in the Brazilian peasantry, being one of the few left wing parties in Brazil that was able to find some representation with the uneducated peasantry. Fought alongside the other left wings group in the civil war. Recently legalized again by the truce.

Brazilian Integralist Action (Ação Integralista Brasileira) (AIB) (Flaming Bolshevik)
Party Ideology: Integralism, Fascism, Far Right
Party Leader: Plínio Salgado
Brief Description: Far right group inspired by Italian fascism and German National-Socialism. Rapidly growing in the anti-left communities of Brazil. Fought alongside Federal troops against the lieutenants and the leftists in the Civil War.

Movement for Popular Action (Movimento da Ação Popular) (MAP) (Serenissima)
Party Ideology: Reformism, Tenentism, Centre
Party Leaders: Luis Carlos Prestes, Eduardo Gomes
Brief Description: Movement composed of the leadership of the lieutenants formed following the end of the Civil War. Still hold a great amount of influence over the army regiemnts across Brazil. Speculation regarding if they will become a political party in the future is large.

Brazilian Patrianovist Imperial Action (Ação Imperial Patrianovista Brasileira) (AIPB) (DutchGuy)
Party Ideology: Monarchism, Conservatism, Right
Party Leaders: Pedro Henrique de Orléans e Bragança, Arlindo Veiga dos Santos
Brief Description: Recently formed pro-monarchist movement, wishing to restore the Brazilian empire originally deposed in the 1889 coup. Still very small, but slowly growing.

States & territories:

Federal Districts: 1
States: 20
Territories: 1

Federal District

Senators: 3
Deputies: 15

Overview: Also known as the 'Guanabara District', special administrative district managed by the National Congress. Location of Rio de Janeiro, one of the largest & wealthiest cities in Brazil, also the capital of the Republic and home of the government. Very industrialized.

Rio de Janeiro

Senators: 3
Deputies: 31

Overview: A developed and rich state, finds itself sourounding the capital. Large industrial centers and developed farmlands are found all over the state.

São Paulo

Senators: 3
Deputies: 55

Overview: The industrial and agricultural heartland of the Republic. Extremely rich and developed cities with large industrial districts. Extremely fertile countryside that produces all the sorts of agricultural products, most especially Brazil's biggest export: coffee. large immigrant population, mostly Italians and Japanesse.

Minas Gerais

Senators: 3
Deputies: 57

Overview: One of the richest and most agriculturally developed states in the union. Produces immense amounts of Iron, Gold, Coffee and Milk. Rapidly developing its industry and expanding its urban centers.

Bahia

Senators: 3
Deputies: 34

Overview: The richest state in the north-eastern region, most famous for it exstensive agricultural output, mostly focused in the plenty of cotton, soy and sugar cane. Slowly developing industry in the larger urban areas. Interior areas remain impoverished, due to government neglect and constant droughts.

Rio Grande do Sul

Senators: 3
Deputies: 28

Overview: Extremely developed state, with a healthy mix of agriculture and industry. Highlight goes to cattle farming, which is by far the most prosperous economic activity in the region. Soy and Rice also extensively produced. Large population of German immigrants.

Pernambuco

Senators: 3
Deputies: 28

Overview: Most industrialized state in the north east accompained by a developed agricultural sector. Has suffered economical backlash over the decline of the sugar cane market, but has maintained its economy. Interior is extremely impoverished and underdeveloped, constantly hit by doughts.

Ceará

Senators: 3
Deputies: 17

Overview: Once one of the most prosperous states, Ceará has been wrecked by several droughts that have damaged the agricultural system of the state. The countryside has fallen to bandits, while the landowners atttempt to keep control. The only somehwat prosperous are is the capital city of Fortaleza.

Paraiba

Senators: 3
Deputies: 11

Overview: A moderately wealthy state in the northeast, has lost alot money with the decline of the sugar cane trade. State also exports a decent amount of minerals. Countryside is geenrally impoverished and filled with bandits.

Pará

Senators: 3
Deputies: 9

Overview: Mostly covered by the Amazon forest, state mostly relies in the large-scale export of minerals such as copper, Iron and aluminium. Most of the state is underdeveloped and unpopulated.

Alagoas

Senators: 3
Deputies: 9

Overview: One of the smallest states in the Union, also one of the poorest. Largely unindustrialized, mostly relies in the declining export of Sugar cane and other smaller agricultural products for income.

Paraná

Senators: 3
Deputies: 9

Overview: A rapidly growing state, exporting large amounts of coffee, corn soy and sugar cane. Population has been increasing steadily since the declaration of the republic.

Mato Grosso

Senators: 3
Deputies: 8

Overview: A very sparsely populated state, with most of its territory being unocupied. Almost entirely agrarian. Mostly rellies on its production of soy and corn.

Santa Catarina

Senators: 3
Deputies: 8

Overview: A small state with a rapidly developing economy. Most of the economy relies in the cattle, soy and tobacco business. Small amounts of industry, epsecially the textile industry, are found in the state's capital of Florianopolis.

Piaui

Senators: 3
Deputies: 7

Overview: One of the poorest states in the Union. Most towns are underdeveloped and impoverished, lacking industry. Mostly rellies in the production of Soy and Sugar cane for its income.

Rio Grande do Norte

Senators: 3
Deputies: 6

Overview: One of the poorer states of Brazil, mostly rellies in the export of Fruits, nuts and sea products. Constantly harassed by droughts, which leaves most of the interior impoverished and underdeveloped.

Espirito Santo

Senators: 3
Deputies: 6

Overview: A small state made rich for its production of coffee and its extraction of iron. Despite having a small population, its economy has been steadily growing since the 1890's.

Goiás

Senators: 3
Deputies: 6

Overview: A largely underdeveloped state of the union, mostly composed of large famsteads and a few average-sized towns. Rellies mostly in the export of meat and other alimentary items. Small amounts of copper also exported.

Maranhão

Senators: 3
Deputies: 6

Overview: A mildly developed state of the Union. Despite most of its population living in poverty, the state is rich in Iron, Aluminium and Gold, as well as producing large amounts of soy and a decent amount of cotton.

Sergipe

Senators: 3
Deputies: 5

Overview: Besides being one of the smallest states for territory, it is a poor and relatively underdeveloped Region of the Union. Mostly rellies in the export of fruits and sugar cane.

Amazonas

Senators: 3
Deputies: 4

Overview: Covered by the Amazon Rainforest, the state remains a mildly prosperous one. Despite losing the revenues of the rubber trade, the state mostly propsers from exporting wood and minerals. Most of the state is underdeveloped however, being covered by rainforest.

Acre Territory

Senators: 0
Deputies: 0

Overview: A territory of the Union and one of the poorest places in Brazil. Wrestled away from Bolivia some 30 years ago following a local revolution. Since its a territory, it lacks any form of representation in the Legislature.

Legislature:

Federal Senate: 63 Seats

PUF: 21
PLD: 17
ANL: 16
PD: 4
PSD: 3
PL: 2

Chamber of Deputies: 350 Seats

PUF: 93
PLD: 91
ANL: 70
PD: 42
PSD: 27
PL: 15
PCB: 4
PSB: 3
AIB: 3
BLOC: 2

Next Election (Both Executive and Legislative): Q2, 1930

Economy:

Finance: The Bank of Brazil issues the Real, used in currency both as paper notes and in gold coins.
Agriculture: The biggest source of income and pride for Brazil. Most of the interior of the states are extensively developed for agricultural use. Largest agricultural products of Brazil are Coffee, Soy, Cotton, Sugar Cane and Meat. Most of the cultivated land is controlled by rich landowners. Small amount controlled by the government.
Industry: Found in concentrated aread around Brazil, but rapidly growing. Most of the industry is concentrated along and in the proximities of the Atlantic coastline in cities like Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Campinas, Santos, Florianopolis and Porto Alegre.
Services: Healthcare, Education, Mail services etc. are all provided by the government, even if not of the best quality and often concentrated in the large urban areas, neglecting the countryside.

Government Budget:

Treasury: 65
Surplus: +10

Revenue: +420


Federal Product Taxes: +60
Income Tax: +60
Corporation Tax: +40
Trade Tariffs: +70

Public Corporations:

National Radio System: +10
National Telegraphic/Telephonic Service: +30
Federal Railways: +30
Municipal Transportation: +20
Postal Service: +20
State Media: +10
National Bank Revenues: +20
State Industry: +20
State Agriculture: +30

Expenditure: -410

Army: -50
Navy: -30
Air Force: -10
Road/Railroad Maintenance: -40
Police Departments: -40
Courts & Law System: -10
Prisons: -10
Government Administration: -20
Pensions: -10
Public Education: -30
Public Health: -30
State Industry: -30
State Agriculture: -20
Energy: -40
Sewage and Water: -20
Corruption: -20

Debt: 80 credits (30 owed to USA, 20 owed to UK, 20 owed to France, 10 owed to Domestic sources)
Interest rate: 20% (Adds 2 credits of debt per annum)
Interest Payments: 0 credits per annum
Total change in debt: +2 credits per annum

Private Sector:

Agriculture: 18
Light Manufacturing: 12
Heavy Manufacturing: 7
Services: 3
Tourism: 1
Luxuries: 3

Life:

Media: Newspapers and pamphlets run across the larger urban centers. Freedom of the Press is enacted, Communist and Anarchist papers are starting to grow. Most political parties have their own newspaper.
Transportation: Railway lines, both private and public, run through most of the countryside. Country lacks major highways, with most interior roads being either small paved ones or dirt roads. Tram services in all major cities. Rivers used extensively for travel in small boats.
Electricity: Most power produced by either hydroelectric dams or imported coal. Larger Cities, Towns and even smaller villages are supplied with electricity. Countryside remains in the dark.
Education: Most of the population is illeterate. The majority of literates are found in the middle & high classes of larger towns and cities. Universities are found in the major urban centers. Outside of the major cities, public education is barely provided.
Labour: 5-day work week, right to organize, bargain collectively or strike, child labour prohibited, some social benefits.
Health: Large and modern hospitals found in the larger urban centers. Smaller cities are served by underfunded and antiquated clinics. Many small towns lack any form of public health center.
Water & Sewage: Cities are provided with clean water and efficient sewage systems. Smaller towns have some sort of water distribution, but usually lack sewage systems.
Food: Food & crops are plentiful in most of the country. Cities are supplied with food daily and most farmers are self sufficient. The northeast is occasionally hit by droughts, which cause large scale famines.
Housing: Cities are a mixture of Colonial, Imperial and new Art-deco architecture. More developed cities in the interior are usually built with colonial architecture. Farms are built in similar styles, but with large distinctions between wealthy and poor farmers.
Crime: Most crime is petty crimes in city centers, usually roberries and theft. Homicide rates are somewhat high, especially in the countryside. Government corruption is quite large and mostly unchecked.
Religion: Most of the population follows Roman-Catholicism, with large pockets of Pretestantism and presbiterianism in the Southern states. Small Jewish communities in the larger urban centers. African-based religions practiced extensively by the Afro-Brazilian population.
Ethnic: Most of the population is composed of 'Pardos', a mixture between Caucasians, Afro-Brazilians and Indigenous groups. Afro-Brazilians and Caucasians follow after. Large amount of German, Italian, Portuguesse and Spanish communities. Growing communities of Japanesse and Arab immigrants in the country.

Authority:

Department of Political & Social Order
Director: João Neves da Fontoura
Operatives: 1,500
Vehicles: 30 cars, 10 trucks
Description: Brazil's political police, responsible for carrying out the Government's dirty and secretive work. Often watch over political movements and trade unions.
Supplies: Ammunition is high, well armed with army-grade weapons & equipment. Heavily funded.

Federal Department of Public Security
Director: Francisco Campos
Police Officers: 1,000
Vehicles: 250 cars, 30 trucks
Description: Brazil's Federal Police force, directly under the control of the executive. Mostly focus in detective and bureaucratic work, though often get involved in normal police action. Also responsible for passport control.
Supplies: Ammunition is moderate, most officers armed only with revolvers and other small arms.

Military Police of Brazil
Head Inspector: Setembrino de Carvalho
Officers: 55,000
Vehicles: 400 cars, 100 trucks, 30 Armoured Vehicles
Description: Despite the 'Military' Tag, this force ends up acting as Brazil's main police force, doing the normal duties of patrolling and order keeping. It holds both strong ties to the Army and to the Government.
Supplies: Ammunition is plentiful in the richer states, the poorer the states, the less ammunition and supplies. Armed mostly with pistols and army rifles such as mauser's and lebel's. Ocassionaly maxim machine guns.

Armed Forces of Brazil

Army of Brazil
Commander-in-Chief: Eurico Gaspar Dutra
Soldiers: 120,000
Cavalry: 20,000
Artillery: 320 Guns, a mixture of Howitzers and French ww1-era artillery.
Description: A powerful institution in Brazil, the creators of the Republic. Despite being neglected for years, the attention towards te army re-appeared, when it was split apart by the civil war. Despite officially loyal to the Government, the Lieutenants hold great indluence over the army. Soldier's councils have formed, most swearing fealty to the Lieutenants, but some to the Communists and Syndicalists.
Supplies: Ammunition and supplies are in general low due to the extensive usage during the civil war. Army mostly equiped with French and German equipment, such as Lebels, Mausers, Lugers etc. Machine guns like Maxim guns also used.

Navy of Brazil
First Admiral: Isaías de Noronha
Armada: 2 Dreadnoughts, 2 Cruisers, 14 Destroyers, 8 Gunboats, 4 Submarines
Marines: 2000
Description: The original rebellious branch of the Armed Forces, having engaged in several rebellions and mutinies since the rise of the republic. Despite its previous track record, the navy remained mostly loyal to the Federal Government during the civil war as the lieutenants failed to gain influence over its officers. There is a growing influence of Communist & Socialist ideals within the Navy however, which are already starting to cause some trouble.
Supplies: Most of the fleet is old and obsolete, with many ships in dire need of repair and modernization of its assets. Many land constructions belonging to the navy, such as shipyards and bases, have fallen to disrepair and disuse. Despite the bad quality of equipment and ships, the supplies of ammunition and oil are found to be in decent amounts.

Air Force of Brazil
Air Marshal: Armando Figueira de Almeida
Planes: 50 Bi-Planes, 15 Bombers, 30 Reconaisance Bi-Planes
Description: The youngest branch of the Armed Forces, only being created in 1927, the Aerial assets of Brazil were previously divided between the army and the navy, only now being turned into an official, separate branch. The newly created Air Force took extensive part in the civil war, remaining the most loyal part of the Armed Forces. The Air Force is still in its infancy, and much must be done to modernize it.
Supplies: While the planes themselves are newly made, their models and types are old and very outdated. Supplies like ammunition and oil are found in good amounts.

Militia's, Paramilitary Groups, Private Companies and others

Public Force of Brazil (Westar)
Commander: Filinto Müller
Loyal to: Vargas and the ANL
Location: São Borga, Rio Grande do Sul
Troops: 2,000 soldiers
Vehicles: 30 cars, 20 trucks
Supplies: Ammunition and supplies are high. Armed with army-grade weapons.

Palmeirista Red Guard (Smyg)
Commander: Gregório Lourenço Bezerra
Loyal to: Brazilian Communist Party
Location: Spread across the states of Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo.
Troops: 3,500 soldiers
Vehicles: 10 cars, 25 trucks
Supplies: Ammunition and supplies are low due to the recent civil war. Weapons vary, some are military grade, others are ordinary civilian weapons.

Integralist Force of Brazil (Flaming Bolshevik)
Commander: Miguel Reale
Loyal to: Integralist Movement
Location: Rio de Janeiro, Federal District
Troops: 400 soldiers
Supplies: Ammunition and supplies are low. Armed with pistols and civilian weaponry.

National Brigade (Serenissima)
Commander: Juarez Tavora
Loyal to: The Lieutenants
Location: Spread across Brazil
Troops: 5,000 soldiers
Vehicles: 20 cars, 30 trucks, 5 armoured vehicles
Supplies: Ammunition and supplies are high. Armed with military equipment.

Armed Workers Federation (Marankara)
Commander: None, controlled by a Committee of the CBT
Loyal to: The CBT
Location: Focused in the large industrial centers of the South-East
Troops: 2,400 soldiers
Vehicles: 10 cars, 30 trucks
Supplies: Ammunition and supplies are moderate. Armed with ordinary civilian weaponry.

Lavras Diamantinas Patriotic Batallion
Commander: Horácio de Matos (Coin)
Location: Chapada Region, State of Bahia
Troops: 3,000 soldiers
Vehicles: 5 cars, 10 trucks
Supplies: Ammunition and supplies are high. Armed with military grade equipment.

People's Freedom Army of Paraguay
Commander: Rafael Franco (Robert Schumann)
Location: Nioaque, State of Mato Grosso
Troops: 1,254 soldiers
Supplies: Ammunition and supplies are very low. Armed with Paraguayan military equipment.

Lampião's Band
Leader: Virgulino Ferreira da Silva "Lampião" (Gesar)
Location: Unknown, last seen in the town of Carira in Sergipe
Troops: 50 soldiers
Supplies: Ammunition and supplies are moderate. Armed with civilian weaponry and equipment stolen form dead soldiers/policemen.

Farquar Unlimited
CEO: Percival Farquhar (CarpeVerpa)
Possessions: Several railway lines, extensive logging operations and Iron Ore mining operations. Also owns several hotels in the major cities.
Guards: 4,500
Vehicles: 40 cars, 100 trucks
Supplies: Ammunition and supplies are high. Guards armed and equiped with American military equipment
Last edited by Luc on 00:31:25 Friday, 06 October, 2017, edited 12 times in total.
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DutchGuy
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by DutchGuy » 22:36:57 Sunday, 01 October, 2017

Brazilian Patrianovist Imperial Action (Ação Imperial Patrianovista Brasileira) (AIPB)
Party Ideology: Monarchism, Conservatism, Right
Party Leaders: Pedro Henrique de Orléans e Bragança, Arlindo Veiga dos Santos
Brief Description: Recently formed pro-monarchist movement, wishing to restore the Brazilian empire originally deposed in the 1889 coup. Still very small, but slowly growing.


Was there ever any doubt.
The Republic of Turkey in scorpion's Metal Gear BoP 2006
The Imperial State of Iran in MasterofOblivion's BoP 1968

marankara
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by marankara » 22:42:36 Sunday, 01 October, 2017

Gimmie them sweet sweet Syndies.

Brazilian Worker's Confederation (Confederação Brasileira dos Trabalhadores) (CBT)
Party Ideology: Anarcho-Communism, Syndicalism, Far Left
Party Leader: Edgard Leuenroth
Brief Description: The remains of the Libertarian Socialist Party. Hold great control over the industrial cooperatives and trade unions in the larger urban centers. Resumed normal activities following the truce with the Federal Governemnt.

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Serenissima
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by Serenissima » 22:44:49 Sunday, 01 October, 2017

As you already know because we discussed this extensively:

Movement for Popular Action (Movimento da Ação Popular) (MAP)
Party Ideology: Reformism, Tenentism, Centre
Party Leaders: Luis Carlos Prestes, Eduardo Gomes
Brief Description: Movement composed of the leadership of the lieutenants formed following the end of the Civil War. Still hold a great amount of influence over the army regiemnts across Brazil. Speculation regarding if they will become a political party in the future is large.
"Imagine lies, and then write them down in order. That is literally all authors do!"

Serenissima's WW2 BoP: The GM (obviously)
Metal Gear BoP: Japan
Brazil: Luís Carlos Prestes, the Knight of Hope

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Luc
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by Luc » 22:46:15 Sunday, 01 October, 2017

The 3 of you are approved
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Luc
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by Luc » 22:49:30 Sunday, 01 October, 2017

Smyg also told me he is interested in the Communist Party, so ill write him down for that.
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acecipher
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by acecipher » 23:19:58 Sunday, 01 October, 2017

Welfare HO.

Social Democratic Party (Partido Social Democrata) (PSD)
Party Ideology: Social-Democracy, Liberalism, Center
Party Leader: Fernando de Sousa Costa
Brief Description: Social Democratic Party recently formed in 1925. Heavily inspired by German/Weimar Social Democratic policies, especially in relation to welfare. Popular with the educated urban middle class.
Brazil: Social Democratic Party

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Luc
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by Luc » 23:21:15 Sunday, 01 October, 2017

acecipher wrote:
23:19:58 Sunday, 01 October, 2017
Welfare HO.

Social Democratic Party (Partido Social Democrata) (PSD)
Party Ideology: Social-Democracy, Liberalism, Center
Party Leader: Fernando de Sousa Costa
Brief Description: Social Democratic Party recently formed in 1925. Heavily inspired by German/Weimar Social Democratic policies, especially in relation to welfare. Popular with the educated urban middle class.
Approved!
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CarpeVerpa
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by CarpeVerpa » 00:50:31 Monday, 02 October, 2017

Percival Farquhar for me, please.
Percival Farquhar - The Republic Asunder: A Brazil Nation Sim

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Luc
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by Luc » 00:53:14 Monday, 02 October, 2017

CarpeVerpa wrote:
00:50:31 Monday, 02 October, 2017
Percival Farquhar for me, please.
Sure thing
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Flaming Bolshevik
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by Flaming Bolshevik » 04:03:58 Monday, 02 October, 2017

Intergralist movement please.
Metal Gear BOP: Syria
Aliens!: Romania
BOP 1800: Saint Domingue
BOP 1990: Netherlands
Brazil: Intergralists

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Smyg
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by Smyg » 05:29:19 Monday, 02 October, 2017

Confirming communists. Will post more later.
Comrade Astrojildo Pereira Duarte Silva
Secretary-General of the Partido Comunista do Brasil
(PCB)


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Luc
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by Luc » 09:21:20 Monday, 02 October, 2017

Both confirmed
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Luc
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by Luc » 18:44:07 Monday, 02 October, 2017

I will need at least the 3 major parties (Federal Union, Liberal-Democrats and ANL) to be filled in order to start the game.
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Coin
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Re: The Republic Asunder: A Brazilian Nation Sim

Post by Coin » 19:17:47 Monday, 02 October, 2017

Horácio de Matos - I'd take a major, but I can't be as active as I'd like, so a good old aristocrat will do nicely.
Brazilsim: Horacio de Matos
MG BoP: Israel

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